stodge
I. transitive verb (stodged; stodging) Etymology: origin unknown Date: 1674 British to stuff full especially with food II. noun Date: 1825 British something or someone stodgy

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • stodge — [stɔdʒ US sta:dʒ] n [U] BrE informal heavy food that makes you feel full very quickly …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • stodge — [ stadʒ ] noun uncount BRITISH food that is solid and unpleasant …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • stodge — ► NOUN informal, chiefly Brit. 1) food that is heavy, filling, and high in carbohydrates. 2) dull and uninspired material or work. DERIVATIVES stodginess noun stodgy adjective. ORIGIN originally a verb in the sense «stuff to stretching point»:… …   English terms dictionary

  • stodge — [stäj] Informal n. [< ?] Chiefly Brit. 1. heavy, filling food, often unpalatable 2. anything boring or hard to learn vi., vt. stodged, stodging Brit. to cram (oneself) with food …   English World dictionary

  • stodge — /stoj/, v., stodged, stodging, n. v.t. 1. to stuff full, esp. with food or drink; gorge. v.i. 2. to trudge: to stodge along through the mire. n. 3. food that is particularly filling. [1665 75; orig. uncert.; in some senses perh. b. stoff (earlier …   Universalium

  • stodge — 1. verb To stuff. 2. noun heavy, dull food, typically those based on starches …   Wiktionary

  • stodge — noun Brit. informal 1》 food that is heavy, filling, and high in carbohydrates. 2》 dull and uninspired material or work. Derivatives stodgily adverb stodginess noun stodgy adjective (stodgier, stodgiest). Origin …   English new terms dictionary

  • stodge — noun (U) 1 heavy food that makes you feel full very quickly 2 BrE informal something written that is very dull and difficult to read …   Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • stodge — Noun. Heavy, filling food, often without much nutrition …   English slang and colloquialisms

  • stodge — UK [stɒdʒ] / US [stɑdʒ] noun [uncountable] British food that is heavy and makes you feel too full …   English dictionary

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