I. adjective (steadier; -est) Etymology: Middle English stedy, from stede Date: 14th century 1. a. direct or sure in movement ; unfaltering <
a steady hand
b. firm in position ; fixed <
held the pole steady
c. keeping nearly upright in a seaway <
a steady ship
2. showing little variation or fluctuation ; stable, uniform <
a steady breeze
steady prices
3. a. not easily disturbed or upset <
steady nerves
b. (1) constant in feeling, principle, purpose, or attachment <
steady friends
(2) dependable c. not given to dissipation ; sobersteadily adverbsteadiness noun Synonyms: steady, even, equable mean not varying throughout a course or extent. steady implies lack of fluctuation or interruption of movement <
steady progress
. even suggests a lack of variation in quality or character <
an even distribution
. equable implies lack of extremes or of sudden sharp changes <
maintain an equable temper
. II. verb (steadied; steadying) Date: 1530 transitive verb to make or keep steady intransitive verb to become steady • steadier noun III. adverb Date: circa 1605 1. in a steady manner ; steadily 2. on the course set — used as a direction to the helmsman of a ship IV. noun (plural steadies) Date: 1792 one that is steady; specifically a boyfriend or girlfriend with whom one goes steady

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.


Look at other dictionaries:

  • steady — adj Steady, uniform, even, equable, constant are comparable when they mean neither markedly varying nor variable but much the same throughout its course or extent. Steady is the most widely applicable of these terms; in general it suggests… …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • steady — [sted′ē] adj. steadier, steadiest [ STEAD + Y2] 1. that does not shake, tremble, totter, etc.; firm; fixed; stable 2. constant, regular, uniform, or continuous; not changing, wavering, or faltering [a steady gaze, a steady diet, a steady rhythm]… …   English World dictionary

  • Steady — Stead y ( [y^]), a. [Compar. {Steadier} ( [i^]*[ e]r); superl. {Steadiest}.] [Cf. AS. stedig sterile, barren, st[ae][eth][eth]ig, steady (in gest[ae][eth][eth]ig), D. stedig, stadig, steeg, G. st[ a]tig, stetig. See {Stead}, n.] 1. Firm in… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • steady — 1520s, replacing earlier steadfast, from STEAD (Cf. stead) + adj. suffix y, perhaps on model of M.Du., M.L.G. stadig. O.E. had stæððig grave, serious, and stedig barren, but neither seems to be the direct source of the modern word. O.N. cognate… …   Etymology dictionary

  • steady — [adj1] stable, fixed abiding, brick wall*, certain, changeless, constant, durable, enduring, equable, even, firm, immovable, never failing, patterned, regular, reliable, safe, set, set in stone*, solid, solid as a rock*, stabile, steadfast,… …   New thesaurus

  • steady — ► ADJECTIVE (steadier, steadiest) 1) firmly fixed, supported, or balanced. 2) not faltering or wavering; controlled. 3) sensible and reliable. 4) regular, even, and continuous in development, frequency, or intensity. ► VERB (steadies …   English terms dictionary

  • Steady — Stead y, v. i. To become steady; to regain a steady position or state; to move steadily. [1913 Webster] Without a breeze, without a tide, She steadies with upright keel. Coleridge. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Steady — Stead y, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Steadied} ( [i^]d); p. pr. & vb. n. {Steadying}.] To make steady; to hold or keep from shaking, reeling, or falling; to make or keep firm; to support; to make constant, regular, or resolute. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • steady — steady; un·steady; …   English syllables

  • steady — index bear (support), consecutive, constant, continual (connected), continuous, controlled (re …   Law dictionary

  • steady — stead|y1 W3 [ˈstedi] adj ▬▬▬▬▬▬▬ 1¦(continuous)¦ 2¦(not moving)¦ 3 steady job/work/income 4¦(voice/look)¦ 5¦(person)¦ 6 steady boyfriend/girlfriend 7 steady relationship ▬▬▬▬▬▬▬ [Date: 1200 1300; Origin: stead] 1.) …   Dictionary of contemporary English

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