I. verb Etymology: Middle English, from Old English spurnan; akin to Old High German spurnan to kick, Latin spernere to spurn, Greek spairein to quiver Date: before 12th century intransitive verb 1. obsolete a. stumble b. kick 1a 2. archaic to reject something disdainfully transitive verb 1. to tread sharply or heavily upon ; trample 2. to reject with disdain or contempt ; scorn Synonyms: see declinespurner noun II. noun Date: 14th century 1. a. kick 1a b. obsolete stumble 2. a. disdainful rejection b. contemptuous treatment

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.


Look at other dictionaries:

  • Spurn — can have other meanings, see the . infobox UK place country = England latitude= 53.575955 longitude= 0.111454 official name= Spurn Head population= civil parish= Easington unitary england = East Riding of Yorkshire region= Yorkshire and the… …   Wikipedia

  • Spurn — (sp[^u]rn), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Spurned} (sp[^u]rnd); p. pr. & vb. n. {Spurning}.] [OE. spurnen to kick against, to stumble over, AS. spurnan to kick, offend; akin to spura spur, OS. & OHG. spurnan to kick, Icel. spyrna, L. spernere to despise,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Spurn — Spurn, n. 1. A kick; a blow with the foot. [R.] [1913 Webster] What defense can properly be used in such a despicable encounter as this but either the slap or the spurn? Milton. [1913 Webster] 2. Disdainful rejection; contemptuous treatment.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Spurn — Spurn, v. i. 1. To kick or toss up the heels. [1913 Webster] The miller spurned at a stone. Chaucer. [1913 Webster] The drunken chairman in the kennel spurns. Gay. [1913 Webster] 2. To manifest disdain in rejecting anything; to make contemptuous… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • spurn — (v.) O.E. spurnan to kick (away), reject, scorn, despise, from P.Gmc. *spurnanan (Cf. O.S., O.H.G. spurnan, O.Fris. spurna, O.N. sporna to kick ), from PIE root *spere ankle (Cf. M.Du. spoor track of an animal, Gk. sphyron ankle, L …   Etymology dictionary

  • spurn — spurn·er; spurn; …   English syllables

  • spurn — [spʉrn] vt. [ME spurnen < OE spurnan, to spurn, kick: see SPUR] 1. Archaic to push or drive away contemptuously with or as with the foot 2. to refuse or reject with contempt or disdain; scorn vi. to show contempt or disdain in refusing or… …   English World dictionary

  • spurn — I verb aspernari, belittle, boot, brush aside, cast aside, cast out, censure, contemn, decline, depreciate, despise, disapprove, discard, disdain, disparage, disregard, drive away, drive back, elude, evade, fastidire, flout, frown upon, have… …   Law dictionary

  • spurn — [spə:n US spə:rn] v [T] [: Old English; Origin: spurnan] literary to refuse to accept something or someone, especially because you are too proud ▪ She spurned all offers of help. ▪ a spurned lover …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • spurn — [ spɜrn ] verb transitive 1. ) OLD FASHIONED to refuse to accept someone s love or friendship: REJECT 2. ) to refuse to accept something, do something, or deal with something …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • spurn — reject, repudiate, refuse, *decline Analogous words: disdain, scorn, scout, *despise, contemn: flout, *scoff, sneer Antonyms: crave: embrace …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

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