some
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English som, adjective & pronoun, from Old English sum; akin to Old High German sum some, Greek hamē somehow, homos same — more at same Date: before 12th century 1. being an unknown, undetermined, or unspecified unit or thing <
some person knocked
>
2. a. being one, a part, or an unspecified number of something (as a class or group) named or implied <
some gems are hard
>
b. being of an unspecified amount or number <
give me some water
>
<
have some apples
>
3. remarkable, striking <
that was some party
>
4. being at least one — used to indicate that a logical proposition is asserted only of a subclass or certain members of the class denoted by the term which it modifies II. pronoun, singular or plural in construction Date: before 12th century 1. one indeterminate quantity, portion, or number as distinguished from the rest 2. an indefinite additional amount <
ran a mile and then some
>
III. adverb Date: before 12th century 1. about <
some 80 houses
>
<
twenty-some people
>
2. a. in some degree ; somewhat <
felt some better
>
b. to some degree or extent ; a little <
the cut bled some
>
<
I need to work on it some more
>
c. — used as a mild intensive <
that's going some
>
Usage: When some is used to modify a number, it is almost always a round number <
a community of some 150,000 inhabitants
>
but because some is slightly more emphatic than about or approximately it is occasionally used with a more exact number in an intensive function <
an expert parachutist, he has some 115 jumps to his credit — Current Biography
>
. When some is used without a number, most commentators feel that somewhat is to be preferred. Their advice is an oversimplification, however; only when some modifies an adjective, usually a comparative, will somewhat always substitute smoothly. When some modifies a verb or adverb, and especially when it follows a verb, substitution of somewhat may prove awkward <
Italy forced me to grow up some — E. W. Brooke
>
<
I'm not a prude; I've been around some in my day — Roy Rogers
>
<
here in Newport, both Southern Cross and Courageous practiced some more — W. N. Wallace
>
.

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Some — (s[u^]m), a. [OE. som, sum, AS. sum; akin to OS., OFries., & OHG. sum, OD. som, D. sommig, Icel. sumr, Dan. somme (pl.), Sw. somlige (pl.), Goth. sums, and E. same. [root]191. See {Same}, a., and cf. { some}.] 1. Consisting of a greater or less… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • some — [ səm, strong sʌm ] function word, quantifier *** Some can be used in the following ways: as a determiner (followed by an uncountable noun): I ll make some coffee. (followed by a plural noun): She brought me some flowers. (followed by a singular… …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • -some — ♦ Élément, du gr. sôma « corps » : centrosome, chromosome, ribosome. somato , some éléments, du gr. sôma, sômatos, corps . some V. somato . ⇒ SOME, élém. formant Élém. tiré du gr. , de « corps », entrant dans la constr. de termes sav. en biol. et …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • -some — as a suffix forming adjectives, it represents O.E. sum (see SOME (Cf. some); Cf. O.Fris. sum, Ger. sam, O.N. samr), related to sama same. As a suffix added to numerals meaning a group of that number (Cf. twosome) it represents O.E. sum some, used …   Etymology dictionary

  • Some — may refer to:*Some, a word denoting an indeterminate number of something: see Grammatical number* Some , a song by Built to Spill from their 1994 album There s Nothing Wrong with Love *Some Records, an US record label.*So Others Might Eat (SOME) …   Wikipedia

  • Some — Données clés Réalisation Chang Yoon hyun Scénario Kim Eun jeong Kim Eun shil Acteurs principaux Ko Soo Song Ji hyo Pays d’origine …   Wikipédia en Français

  • some — O.E. sum some, from P.Gmc. *sumas (Cf. O.S., O.Fris., O.H.G. sum, O.N. sumr, Goth. sums), from PIE root *sem one, as one (Cf. Skt. samah even, level, similar, identical; Gk. HAMO (Cf. hamo ); see SAME (Cf …   Etymology dictionary

  • -some — ( s[u^]m). [AS. sum; akin to G. & OHG. sam, Icel. samr, Goth. lustusams longed for. See {Same}, a., and cf. {Some}, a.] An adjective suffix having primarily the sense of like or same, and indicating a considerable degree of the thing or quality… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • -some — ( s[=o]m). A combining form or suffix from Gr. sw^ma (gen. sw matos) the body; as in merosome, a body segment; cephalosome, etc. [1913 Webster] [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • -some — [səm] suffix [Sense: 1; Origin: Old English sum] [Sense: 2; Origin: some] 1.) [in adjectives] tending to behave in a particular way, or having a particular quality ▪ a troublesome boy (=who causes trouble) ▪ a bothersome back injury (=that… …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • some — index several (plural) Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …   Law dictionary

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