society
I. noun (plural -ties) Etymology: Middle French societé, from Latin societat-, societas, from socius companion — more at social Date: 1531 1. companionship or association with one's fellows ; friendly or intimate intercourse ; company 2. a voluntary association of individuals for common ends; especially an organized group working together or periodically meeting because of common interests, beliefs, or profession 3. a. an enduring and cooperating social group whose members have developed organized patterns of relationships through interaction with one another b. a community, nation, or broad grouping of people having common traditions, institutions, and collective activities and interests 4. a. a part of a community that is a unit distinguishable by particular aims or standards of living or conduct ; a social circle or a group of social circles having a clearly marked identity <
literary society
>
b. a part of the community that sets itself apart as a leisure class and that regards itself as the arbiter of fashion and manners 5. a. a natural group of plants usually of a single species or habit within an association b. the progeny of a pair of insects when constituting a social unit (as a hive of bees); broadly an interdependent system of organisms or biological units II. adjective Date: 1693 of, relating to, or typical of fashionable society

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

Synonyms:

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  • Society — • Implies fellowship, company, and has always been conceived as signifying a human relation Catholic Encyclopedia. Kevin Knight. 2006. Society     Society      …   Catholic encyclopedia

  • society — so‧ci‧e‧ty [səˈsaɪti] noun societies PLURALFORM 1. [uncountable] people in general, considered in relation to the structure of laws, organizations etc that make it possible for them to live together: • Society may decide that it dislikes… …   Financial and business terms

  • Society — So*ci e*ty, n.; pl. {Societies}. [L. societas, fr. socius a companion: cf. F. soci[ e]t[ e]. See {Social}.] 1. The relationship of men to one another when associated in any way; companionship; fellowship; company. Her loved society. Milton. [1913 …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • society — [sə sī′ə tē] n. pl. societies [MFr société < L societas < socius, companion: see SOCIAL] 1. a group of persons regarded as forming a single community, esp. as forming a distinct social or economic class 2. the system or condition of living… …   English World dictionary

  • Society — est un film américain réalisé par Brian Yuzna, sorti en 1989. Sommaire 1 Synopsis 2 Fiche technique 3 Distribution 4 Autour du film …   Wikipédia en Français

  • society — [n1] humankind, people association, camaraderie, civilization, commonality, commonwealth, community, companionship, company, comradeship, culture, friendship, general public, humanity, jungle*, nation, population, public, rat race*, social order …   New thesaurus

  • society — so·ci·e·ty /sə sī ə tē/ n pl ties 1: the benefits of love, care, affection, and companionship that family members receive from each other sought damages for loss of society from his wife s wrongful death compare consortium 2: a voluntary… …   Law dictionary

  • society — ► NOUN (pl. societies) 1) the aggregate of people living together in a more or less ordered community. 2) a particular community of people living in a country or region, and having shared customs, laws, and organizations. 3) (also high society)… …   English terms dictionary

  • society — (n.) 1530s, friendly association with others, from O.Fr. societe, from L. societatem (nom. societas), from socius companion (see SOCIAL (Cf. social)). Meaning group of people living together in an ordered community is from 1630s. Sense of… …   Etymology dictionary

  • society — 1 elite, *aristocracy, nobility, gentry, county 2 *association, order, club …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • society — (del inglés) sustantivo femenino 1. Se usa en la locución locución …   Diccionario Salamanca de la Lengua Española

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