slough
I. noun Etymology: Middle English sloughe, slo, from Old English slōh; akin to Middle High German slouche ditch Date: before 12th century 1. a. a place of deep mud or mire b. (also slew) (or slue) (1) swamp (2) an inlet on a river; also backwater (3) a creek in a marsh or tide flat 2. a state of moral degradation or spiritual dejection • sloughy adjective II. verb Date: 1846 transitive verb to engulf in a slough intransitive verb to plod through or as if through mud ; slog III. noun also sluff Etymology: Middle English slughe; akin to Middle High German slūch snakeskin Date: 14th century 1. the cast-off skin of a snake 2. a mass of dead tissue separating from an ulcer 3. something that may be shed or cast off IV. verb also sluff Date: 1720 intransitive verb 1. a. to become shed or cast off b. to cast off one's skin c. to separate in the form of dead tissue from living tissue 2. to crumble slowly and fall away transitive verb 1. to cast off 2. a. to get rid of or discard as irksome, objectionable, or disadvantageous — usually used with off b. to dispose of (a losing card in bridge) by discarding Synonyms: see discard

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

Synonyms:

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  • Slough — …   Wikipedia Español

  • Slough — Slough, n. [OE. slogh, slough, AS. sl[=o]h a hollow place; cf. MHG. sl[=u]ch an abyss, gullet, G. schlucken to swallow; also Gael. & Ir. sloc a pit, pool. ditch, Ir. slug to swallow. Gr. ????? to hiccough, to sob.] 1. A place of deep mud or mire; …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Slough — Slough …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Slough — Slough, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Sloughed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Sloughing}.] (Med.) To form a slough; to separate in the form of dead matter from the living tissues; often used with off, or away; as, a sloughing ulcer; the dead tissues slough off slowly …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • slough — slough1 [sluf] n. [ME slouh, akin to Ger schlauch, a skin, bag < IE base * sleug̑ , to glide, slip > Latvian sl užât, to slide] 1. the skin of a snake, esp. the outer layer that is periodically cast off 2. any castoff layer, covering, etc …   English World dictionary

  • Slough — Slough, v. t. To cast off; to discard as refuse. [1913 Webster] New tint the plumage of the birds, And slough decay from grazing herds. Emerson. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Slough — Slough, obs. imp. of {Slee}, to slay. Slew. Chaucer. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Slough — Slough, n. [OE. slugh, slouh; cf. MHG. sl?ch the skin of a serpent, G. schlauch a skin, a leather bag or bottle.] 1. The skin, commonly the cast off skin, of a serpent or of some similar animal. [1913 Webster] 2. (Med.) The dead mass separating… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Slough — Slough, a. Slow. [Obs.] Chaucer. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • slough — Ⅰ. slough [1] ► NOUN 1) a swamp. 2) a situation characterized by lack of progress or activity. DERIVATIVES sloughy adjective. ORIGIN Old English. Ⅱ. slough …   English terms dictionary

  • Slough — (spr. Slok), Dorf an der Themse u. an der Eisenbahn von London nach Bath u. Bristol, unweit Windsor in der englischen Grafschaft Buckingham; hier sonst Herschels Sternwarte u. Riesenteleskop …   Pierer's Universal-Lexikon

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