slobber
I. verb (slobbered; slobbering) Etymology: Middle English sloberen to eat in a slovenly manner; akin to Low German slubberen to sip Date: 1607 intransitive verb 1. to let saliva dribble from the mouth ; drool 2. to indulge the feelings effusively and without restraint transitive verb to smear with or as if with dribbling saliva or food • slobberer noun II. noun Date: circa 1755 1. saliva drooled from the mouth 2. driveling, sloppy, or incoherent utterance • slobbery adjective

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

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  • slobber — ► VERB 1) have saliva dripping copiously from the mouth. 2) (slobber over) show excessive enthusiasm for. ► NOUN ▪ saliva dripping copiously from the mouth. DERIVATIVES slobbery adjective. ORIGIN pr …   English terms dictionary

  • Slobber — Slob ber, v. t. & i. See {Slabber}. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Slobber — Slob ber, n. 1. See {Slabber}. [1913 Webster] 2. (Zo[ o]l.) A jellyfish. [Prov. Eng.] [1913 Webster] 3. pl. (Vet.) Salivation. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • slobber — (v.) c.1400, probably related to Frisian slobberje to slurp, M.L.G. slubberen slurp, M.Du. overslubberen wade through a ditch, etc., all of imitative origin. Related: Slobbered; slobbering …   Etymology dictionary

  • slobber — [v] drool dribble, drip, drivel, froth, salivate, slabber, slaver, water at the mouth; concept 185 …   New thesaurus

  • slobber — [släb′ər] vi. [ME sloberen, prob. < or akin to LowG slubberen, to swig, lap: for IE base see SLOVEN] 1. to let saliva, food, etc. run from the mouth; slaver 2. to speak, write, etc. in a mawkish or maudlin way vt. to wet, smear, or dribble on… …   English World dictionary

  • slobber — slob|ber1 [ slabər ] noun uncount INFORMAL SALIVA (=the clear liquid produced by your mouth): A little slobber came out of his mouth when he spoke. slobber slob|ber 2 [ slabər ] verb intransitive to have SALIVA coming out of your mouth: a great… …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • slobber — slob|ber [ˈslɔbə US ˈsla:bər] v [Date: 1300 1400; Origin: Perhaps from [i]Middle Dutch slobberen to eat noisily ] to let ↑saliva (=the liquid produced by your mouth) come out of your mouth and run down = ↑drool ▪ I hate dogs that slobber… …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • slobber — UK [ˈslɒbə(r)] / US [ˈslɑbər] verb [intransitive] Word forms slobber : present tense I/you/we/they slobber he/she/it slobbers present participle slobbering past tense slobbered past participle slobbered to have saliva coming out of your mouth a… …   English dictionary

  • slobber — Slabber Slab ber, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Slabbered}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Slabbering}.] [OE. slaberen; akin to LG. & D. slabbern, G. schlabbern, LG. & D. slabben, G. schlabben, Icel. slafra. Cf. {Slaver}, {Slobber}, {Slubber}.] To let saliva or some… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • slobber — 1. noun Liquid material, generally saliva, that dribbles or drools outward and downward from the mouth. There was dried slobber on his coat lapel. 2. verb To emit saliva or intaken but not yet swallowed liquid to run from ones mouth. To drool.… …   Wiktionary

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