shoot
I. verb (shot; shooting) Etymology: Middle English sheten, shoten, shuten, from Old English scēotan; akin to Old Norse skjōta to shoot Date: before 12th century transitive verb 1. a. (1) to eject or impel or cause to be ejected or impelled by a sudden release of tension (as of a bowstring or slingshot or by a flick of a finger) <
shoot an arrow
>
<
shoot a spitball
>
<
shoot a marble
>
(2) to drive forth or cause to be driven forth by an explosion (as of a powder charge in a firearm or of ignited fuel in a rocket) (3) to drive forth or cause to be driven forth by a sudden release of gas or air <
shoot darts from a blowgun
>
<
a steam catapult shoots planes from a carrier
>
(4) to propel (as a ball or puck) toward a goal by striking or pushing with part of the body (as the hand or foot) or with an implement; also to score by so doing <
shoot the winning goal
>
<
shoot a basket
>
(5) to throw or cast off or out often with force <
shoot dice
>
<
the horse shot his rider out of the saddle
>
b. to cause (as a gun or bow) to propel a missile c. (1) to utter (as words or sounds) rapidly or suddenly or with force <
shoot out a stream of invective
>
(2) to emit (as light, flame, or fumes) suddenly and rapidly (3) to send forth with suddenness or intensity <
shot a look of anger at them
>
d. to discharge, dump, or empty especially by overturning, upending, or directing into a slide 2. to affect by shooting: as a. to strike with a missile especially from a bow or gun; especially to wound or kill with a missile discharged from a bow or firearm b. to remove or destroy by use of firearms <
shot out the light
>
; also wreck, explode 3. a. to push or slide (as the bolt of a door or lock) into or out of a fastening b. to push or thrust forward ; stick out <
toads shooting out their tongues
>
c. to put forth in growing d. to place, send, or bring into position abruptly 4. a. (1) to engage in (a sport or game or a portion of a game that involves shooting) ; play <
shoot pool
>
<
shoot a round of golf
>
<
shoot craps
>
(2) to achieve (a particular score) in a game that involves shooting <
shoot 80 in golf
>
b. (1) to place or offer (a bet) on the result of casting dice <
shoot $5
>
(2) to use up by or as if by betting ; exhaust <
shot his annual bonus on a shady deal
>
5. a. to engage in the hunting and killing of (as game) with firearms especially as a sport <
shoot woodcock
>
b. to hunt over <
shoot a tract of woodland
>
6. a. to cause to move suddenly or swiftly forward <
shot the car onto the highway
>
b. to send or carry quickly ; dispatch <
shoot the letter on to me as soon as you receive it
>
7. to variegate as if by sprinkling color in streaks, flecks, or patches 8. to pass swiftly by, past, or along <
shooting rapids
>
9. to plane (as the edge of a board) straight or true 10. a. set off, detonate, ignite <
shoot a charge of dynamite
>
b. to effect by blasting 11. to determine the altitude of 12. to take a picture or series of pictures or television images of ; photograph, film 13. a. to give an injection to b. to inject (an illicit drug) especially into the bloodstream intransitive verb 1. a. to go or pass rapidly and precipitately <
sparks shooting all over
>
<
his feet shot out from under him
>
b. to move ahead by force of momentum c. to stream out suddenly ; spurt d. to dart in or as if in rays from a source of light e. to dart with a piercing sensation <
pain shot up my arm
>
2. a. to cause an engine or weapon to discharge a missile b. to use a firearm or bow especially for sport (as in hunting) 3. to propel a missile <
guns that shoot many miles
>
4. protrude, project 5. a. to grow or sprout by or as if by putting forth shoots b. develop, mature c. to spring or rise rapidly or suddenly — often used with up <
in a burst of growth he shot up to six feet tall
>
<
prices shot up
>
6. a. to propel an object (as a ball) in a particular way b. to drive the ball or puck toward a goal 7. to cast dice 8. to slide into or out of a fastening <
a bolt that shoots in either direction
>
9. to record something (as on film or videotape) with a camera 10. to begin to speak — usually used as an imperative <
OK, shoot, what do you have to say
>
II. noun Etymology: Middle English schot, schote projectile, new growth, in part from shoten, verb, in part from Old English sceot shot Date: 15th century 1. a sending out of new growth or the growth sent out: as a. a stem or branch with its leaves and appendages especially when not yet mature b. offshoot 2. a. an act of shooting (as with a bow or a firearm): (1) shot (2) the firing of a missile especially by artillery b. (1) a hunting trip or party (2) the right to shoot game in a particular area or land over which it is held c. (1) a shooting match <
skeet shoot
>
(2) a round of shots in a shooting match d. the action or an instance of shooting with a camera ; a session or a series of sessions of photographing or filming <
a movie shoot
>
3. a. a motion or movement of rapid thrusting: as (1) a sudden or rapid advance (2) a momentary darting sensation ; twinge (3) thrust 2b (4) the pace between strokes in rowing b. a bar of rays ; beam <
a shoot of sunlight
>
4. [probably by folk etymology from French chute — more at chute] a. a rush of water down a steep or rapid b. a place where a stream runs or descends swiftly III. interjection Etymology: euphemism for shit Date: 1876 — used to express annoyance or surprise

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • shoot — shoot …   Dictionnaire des rimes

  • shoot — [ ʃut ] n. m. • 1893; mot angl., de to shoot « lancer, tirer » ♦ Anglic. I ♦ Au football, Tir ou dégagement puissant. II ♦ (v. 1970; mot angl. amér.) Fam. Piqûre, injection d un stupéfiant. ⇒ 2. fixe. Se faire un shoot d héroïne. ● shoot nom… …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • shoot — ► VERB (past and past part. shot) 1) kill or wound (a person or animal) with a bullet or arrow. 2) cause (a gun) to fire. 3) move suddenly and rapidly. 4) direct (a glance, question, or remark) at someone. 5) film or photograph (a scene, film,… …   English terms dictionary

  • shoot — [sho͞ot] vt. shot, shooting [ME shoten < OE sceotan, akin to ON skjōta, Ger schiessen < IE base * (s)keud , to throw, shoot > SHUT, OSlav is kydati, to throw out] 1. a) to move swiftly over, by, across, etc. [to shoot the rapids in a… …   English World dictionary

  • shoot — shoot; bum·ber·shoot; in·ter·shoot; muck·le·shoot; para·shoot; shoot·able; shoot·ee; shoot·ing; shoot·ist; shoot·man; shoot·out; shoot·er; …   English syllables

  • Shoot — Shoot, v. i. 1. To cause an engine or weapon to discharge a missile; said of a person or an agent; as, they shot at a target; he shoots better than he rides. [1913 Webster] The archers have . . . shot at him. Gen. xlix. 23. [1913 Webster] 2. To… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • shoot — [ʆuːt] verb shot PTandPP [ʆɒt ǁ ʆɑːt] [intransitive] to quickly increase in number or amount: shoot above/​from/​to • Oil prices shot above $40 a barrel. • The monthly interest rate shot to 10% in January. shoot ahead phrasa …   Financial and business terms

  • Shoot — Shoot, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Shot}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Shooting}. The old participle {Shotten} is obsolete. See {Shotten}.] [OE. shotien, schotien, AS. scotian, v. i., sce[ o]tan; akin to D. schieten, G. schie?en, OHG. sciozan, Icel. skj?ta, Sw.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • shoot — vb 1 *fly, dart, float, skim, scud, sail Analogous words: *speed, hasten, hurry, quicken 2 *rush, dash, tear, charge Analogous words: dart, *fly, scud: *spe …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • Shoot — Shoot, n. [F. chute. See {Chute}. Confused with shoot to let fly.] An inclined plane, either artificial or natural, down which timber, coal, etc., are caused to slide; also, a narrow passage, either natural or artificial, in a stream, where the… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Shoot — Shoot, n. 1. The act of shooting; the discharge of a missile; a shot; as, the shoot of a shuttle. [1913 Webster] The Turkish bow giveth a very forcible shoot. Bacon. [1913 Webster] One underneath his horse to get a shoot doth stalk. Drayton.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”