I. noun Etymology: Middle English; akin to Middle High German schoc heap Date: 14th century a pile of sheaves of grain or stalks of Indian corn set up in a field with the butt ends down II. transitive verb Date: 15th century to collect into shocks III. noun Usage: often attributive Etymology: Middle French choc, from choquer to strike against, from Old French choquier, probably of Germanic origin; akin to Middle Dutch schocken to jolt Date: 1565 1. the impact or encounter of individuals or groups in combat 2. a. a violent shake or jar ; concussion b. an effect of such violence 3. a. (1) a disturbance in the equilibrium or permanence of something (2) a sudden or violent mental or emotional disturbance b. something that causes such disturbance <
the loss came as a shock
c. a state of being so disturbed <
were in shock after they heard the news
4. a state of profound depression of the vital processes associated with reduced blood volume and pressure and caused usually by severe especially crushing injuries, hemorrhage, or burns 5. sudden stimulation of the nerves and convulsive contraction of the muscles caused by the discharge of electricity through the animal body 6. a. stroke 5 b. coronary thrombosis 7. shock absorber Synonyms: see impact IV. verb Date: 1656 transitive verb 1. a. to strike with surprise, terror, horror, or disgust b. to cause to undergo a physical or nervous shock c. to subject to the action of an electrical discharge 2. to drive by or as if by a shock intransitive verb 1. to meet with a shock ; collide 2. to cause surprise or shock <
an exhibit meant to shock
shockable adjective V. adjective Etymology: perhaps from 1shock Date: 1681 bushy, shaggy VI. noun Date: 1819 a thick bushy mass (as of hair)

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.


Look at other dictionaries:

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  • shock — m. angiol. Alteración grave de la circulación sanguínea que se manifiesta por una distribución anormal de este líquido en el organismo o por un descenso del volumen de sangre en circulación. La disminución de la cantidad de sangre que llega a los …   Diccionario médico

  • shock — shock1 [shäk] n. [Fr choc < choquer: see SHOCK1 the vt.] 1. the impact of persons, forces, etc. in combat or collision 2. a) a sudden, powerful concussion; violent blow, shake, or jar [the shock of an earthquake] b) the result or effect of s …   English World dictionary

  • Shock — Shock, n. [Cf. D. schok a bounce, jolt, or leap, OHG. scoc a swing, MHG. schoc, Icel. skykkjun tremuously, F. choc a shock, collision, a dashing or striking against, Sp. choque, It. ciocco a log. [root]161. Cf. {Shock} to shake.] 1. A quivering… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Shock — Saltar a navegación, búsqueda Clasificación de los tipos de Choque . HIPOVOLÉMICO NO TRAUMÁTICO Hemorragia Pérdida de líquidos TRAUMÁTICO CARDIOGÉNICO REDUCCIÓN DE FUNCIÓN SISTÓLICA Infarto agudo de miocardio Miocardiopatías Depresión miocár …   Wikipedia Español

  • Shock — Shock, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Shocked}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Shocking}.] [OE. schokken; cf. D. schokken, F. choquer, Sp. chocar. [root]161. Cf. {Chuck} to strike, {Jog}, {Shake}, {Shock} a striking, {Shog}, n. & v.] 1. To give a shock to; to cause to… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • shock — adj: of, relating to, or being a criminal sentence or condition of release involving participation in a program of vigorous physical training, discipline, regimentation, and rehabilitation therapy shock incarceration shock probation shock parole… …   Law dictionary

  • shock — Ⅰ. shock [1] ► NOUN 1) a sudden upsetting or surprising event or experience, or the resulting feeling. 2) an acute medical condition associated with a fall in blood pressure, caused by loss of blood, severe burns, sudden emotional stress, etc. 3) …   English terms dictionary

  • Shock — Shock, v. t. To collect, or make up, into a shock or shocks; to stook; as, to shock rye. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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