self
I. pronoun Etymology: Middle English (intensive pronoun), from Old English; akin to Old High German selb, intensive pronoun, and probably to Latin suus one's own — more at suicide Date: before 12th century myself, himself, herself <
a check payable to self
>
II. adjective Date: before 12th century 1. obsolete identical, same 2. obsolete belonging to oneself ; own 3. a. having a single character or quality throughout; specifically having one color only <
a self flower
>
b. of the same kind (as in color, material, or pattern) as something with which it is used <
self trimming
>
III. noun (plural selves) Date: 13th century 1. a. the entire person of an individual b. the realization or embodiment of an abstraction 2. a. (1) an individual's typical character or behavior <
her true self was revealed
>
(2) an individual's temporary behavior or character <
his better self
>
b. a person in prime condition <
feel like my old self today
>
3. the union of elements (as body, emotions, thoughts, and sensations) that constitute the individuality and identity of a person 4. personal interest or advantage 5. material that is part of an individual organism <
ability of the immune system to distinguish self from nonself
>
IV. verb Date: 1905 transitive verb 1. inbreed 2. to pollinate with pollen from the same flower or plant intransitive verb to undergo self-pollination

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Self — Self, n.; pl. {Selves}. 1. The individual as the object of his own reflective consciousness; the man viewed by his own cognition as the subject of all his mental phenomena, the agent in his own activities, the subject of his own feelings, and the …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • self- — ♦ Élément, de l angl. self « soi même ». ⇒ auto . self élément, de l angl. self, qui signifie soi même . ⇒SELF , élém. de compos. Élém. tiré de l angl. self « soi même », de même sens, entrant dans la constr. de subst. empr. à l angl. ou faits… …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • self — self, the self In sociology, the concept of self is most frequently held to derive from the philosophies of Charles Horton Cooley , William James , and George Herbert Mead , and is the foundation of symbolic interactionism . It highlights the… …   Dictionary of sociology

  • self — /self/, n., pl. selves, adj., pron., pl. selves, v. n. 1. a person or thing referred to with respect to complete individuality: one s own self. 2. a person s nature, character, etc.: his better self. 3. personal interest. 4. Philos. a …   Universalium

  • self — self; self·dom; self·hood; self·ish·ness; self·ism; self·ist; self·less; self·ness; self·same·ness; thy·self; un·self; do it your·self; do it your·self·er; non·self; it·self; self·ish; self·ward; self·ish·ly; self·ward·ness; self·wards; …   English syllables

  • Self — объектно ориентированный, прототипный язык программирования, который задумывался как развитие языка Smalltalk. Разрабатывался в лаборатории Xerox PARC, а потом в Стэндфордском университете. Это была экспериментальная разработка, целью которой… …   Википедия

  • self — [ self ] (plural selves [ selvz ] ) noun *** count or uncount who you are and what you think and feel, especially the conscious feeling of being separate and different from other people: sense of self: Young babies do not have a fully developed… …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • self — W3S2 [self] n plural selves [selvz] [: Old English;] 1.) [C usually singular] the type of person you are, your character, your typical behaviour etc sb s usual/normal self ▪ Sid was not his usual smiling self. be/look/feel (like) your old self… …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • self — W3S2 [self] n plural selves [selvz] [: Old English;] 1.) [C usually singular] the type of person you are, your character, your typical behaviour etc sb s usual/normal self ▪ Sid was not his usual smiling self. be/look/feel (like) your old self… …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • self- — is a highly productive prefix forming compounds of various types, in most of which self acts as the object on which the action or attribute signified by the second element operates, e.g. self betrayal (= betrayal of oneself), self awareness (=… …   Modern English usage

  • self- — [self] [ME < OE < self: see SELF] prefix 1. of oneself or itself: refers to the direct object of the implied transitive verb [self love, self restraint] 2. by oneself or itself: refers to the subject of the implied verb [self acting] 3. in …   English World dictionary

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”