seal
I. noun (plural seals; also seal) Etymology: Middle English sele, from Old English seolh; akin to Old High German selah seal Date: before 12th century 1. any of numerous carnivorous marine mammals (families Phocidae and Otariidae) that live chiefly in cold regions and have limbs modified into webbed flippers adapted primarily to swimming; especially a fur seal or hair seal as opposed to a sea lion 2. a. the pelt of a fur seal b. leather made from the skin of a seal 3. a dark brown II. intransitive verb Date: 1828 to hunt seals III. noun Etymology: Middle English sele, seel, from Anglo-French seal, sel, from Latin sigillum seal, from diminutive of signum sign, seal — more at sign Date: 13th century 1. a. something that confirms, ratifies, or makes secure ; guarantee, assurance b. (1) a device with a cut or raised emblem, symbol, or word used especially to certify a signature or authenticate a document (2) a medallion or ring face bearing such a device incised so that it can be impressed on wax or moist clay; also a piece of wax or a wafer bearing such an impression c. an impression, device, or mark given the effect of a common-law seal by statute law or by American local custom recognized by judicial decision d. a usually ornamental adhesive stamp that may be used to close a letter or package; especially one given in a fund-raising campaign 2. a. something that secures (as a wax seal on a document) b. a closure that must be broken to be opened and that thus reveals tampering c. (1) a tight and perfect closure (as against the passage of gas or water) (2) a device to prevent the passage or return of gas or air into a pipe or container 3. a seal that is a symbol or mark of office IV. transitive verb Date: 14th century 1. a. to confirm or make secure by or as if by a seal <
seal the deal
>
b. to solemnize for eternity (as a marriage) by a Mormon rite 2. a. to set or affix an authenticating seal to; also authenticate, ratify b. to mark with a stamp or seal usually as an evidence of standard exactness, legal size, weight, or capacity, or merchantable quality 3. a. to fasten with or as if with a seal to prevent tampering b. to close or make secure against access, leakage, or passage by a fastening or coating c. to fix in position or close breaks in with a filling (as of plaster) 4. to determine irrevocably or indisputably <
that answer sealed our fate
>

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

Synonyms:

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  • seal — 1 n [Old French seel, from Latin sigillum, from diminutive of signum mark, sign]: a device (as an emblem, symbol, or word) used to identify or replace a signature and to authenticate (as at common law) written matter see also contract under seal… …   Law dictionary

  • Seal — may refer to:Legal* Seal (contract law), a legal formality for contracts and other instruments * Seal (device), an official stamp or symbol used as a means of authentication * Seal (Chinese), a stamp used in East Asia as a form of a signature *… …   Wikipedia

  • seal — seal1 [sēl] n. [ME seel < OFr < L sigillum, a seal, mark, dim. of signum: see SIGN] 1. a design, initial, or other device placed on a letter, document, etc., as a mark of genuineness or authenticity: letters were, esp. formerly, closed with …   English World dictionary

  • Seal — auf der Berlinale 2008 Seal (* 19. Februar 1963 in London, als Seal Henry Olusegun Olumide Adeola Samuel) ist ein britischer Sänger nigerianischer und brasilianischer Abstammung …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Seal — (s[=e]l), n. [OE. sele, AS. seolh; akin to OHG. selah, Dan. s[ae]l, Sw. sj[ a]l, Icel. selr.] (Zo[ o]l.) Any aquatic carnivorous mammal of the families {Phocid[ae]} and {Otariid[ae]}. [1913 Webster] Note: Seals inhabit seacoasts, and are found… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Seal — Seal, n. [OE. seel, OF. seel, F. sceau, fr. L. sigillum a little figure or image, a seal, dim. of signum a mark, sign, figure, or image. See {Sign}, n., and cf. {Sigil}.] 1. An engraved or inscribed stamp, used for marking an impression in wax or …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Seal — • The use of a seal by men of wealth and position was common before the Christian era. It was natural then that high functionaries of the Church should adopt the habit as soon as they became socially and politically important Catholic… …   Catholic encyclopedia

  • Seal — Seal, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Sealed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Sealing}.] [OE. selen; cf. OF. seeler, seieler, F. sceller, LL. sigillare. See {Seal} a stamp.] 1. To set or affix a seal to; hence, to authenticate; to confirm; to ratify; to establish; as, to …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • SEAL — oder SEAL ist die Bezeichnung für: einen englischen Sänger, siehe Seal eine grafische Benutzeroberfläche für DOS. Siehe SEAL (Computer) eine Sound Bibliothek für verschiedene Plattformen (Synthetic Audio Library) ein britisches U Boot, das von… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Seal — 〈[ si:l] m. 6; kurz für〉 Sealskin (1) [engl., „Robbe“; → Seehund] * * * Seal [zi:l , auch: si:l], der od. das; s, s [engl. seal = Robbe]: 1. a) Fell bestimmter Robbenarten; b) aus Seal (1 …   Universal-Lexikon

  • seal — Ⅰ. seal [1] ► NOUN 1) a device or substance used to join two things together or make something impervious. 2) a piece of wax or lead with an individual design stamped into it, attached to a document as a guarantee of authenticity. 3) a… …   English terms dictionary

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