I. noun Etymology: Middle English scald, scold, perhaps of Scandinavian origin; akin to Old Norse skāld poet, skald, Icelandic skālda to make scurrilous verse Date: 12th century 1. a. one who scolds habitually or persistently b. a woman who disturbs the public peace by noisy and quarrelsome or abusive behavior 2. scolding II. verb Date: 14th century intransitive verb 1. obsolete to quarrel noisily 2. to find fault noisily or angrily transitive verb to censure severely or angrily ; rebukescolder noun Synonyms: scold, upbraid, berate, rail, revile, vituperate mean to reproach angrily and abusively. scold implies rebuking in irritation or ill temper justly or unjustly <
angrily scolding the children
. upbraid implies censuring on definite and usually justifiable grounds <
upbraided her assistants for poor research
. berate suggests prolonged and often abusive scolding <
berated continually by an overbearing boss
. rail (at or against) stresses an unrestrained berating <
railed loudly at their insolence
. revile implies a scurrilous, abusive attack prompted by anger or hatred <
an alleged killer reviled in the press
. vituperate suggests a violent reviling <
was vituperated for betraying his friends

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.


Look at other dictionaries:

  • scold — n shrew, vixen, termagant, *virago, amazon scold vb Scold, upbraid, rate, berate, tongue lash, jaw, bawl, chew out, wig, rail, revile, vituperate can all mean to reprove, reproach, or censure angrily, harshly, and more or less abusively. Scold,… …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • Scold — Scold, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Scolded}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Scolding}.] [Akin to D. schelden, G. schelten, OHG. sceltan, Dan. skielde.] To find fault or rail with rude clamor; to brawl; to utter harsh, rude, boisterous rebuke; to chide sharply or… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Scold — Scold, n. 1. One who scolds, or makes a practice of scolding; esp., a rude, clamorous woman; a shrew. [1913 Webster] She is an irksome, brawling scold. Shak. [1913 Webster] 2. A scolding; a brawl. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • scold — [skəuld US skould] v [T] [Date: 1200 1300; Origin: Probably from a Scandinavian language] to angrily criticize someone, especially a child, about something they have done = ↑tell off ▪ Do not scold the puppy, but simply and firmly say no. scold… …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • scold — scold·er; scold·ing·ly; scold; …   English syllables

  • Scold — Scold, v. t. To chide with rudeness and clamor; to rate; also, to rebuke or reprove with severity. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • scold — [skōld] n. [ME scolde < ON skald, poet (prob. of satirical verses)] a person, esp. a woman, who habitually uses abusive language vt. [ME scolden < the n.] to find fault with angrily; rebuke or chide severely vi. 1. to find fault angrily 2.… …   English World dictionary

  • scold — index castigate, denounce (condemn), disapprove (condemn), fault, inveigh, rebuke, remonstrate …   Law dictionary

  • scold — (n.) mid 12c., person of ribald speech, also person fond of abusive language, from O.N. skald poet (see SKALD (Cf. skald)). The sense evolution may reflect the fact that Germanic poets (like their Celtic counterparts) were famously feared for… …   Etymology dictionary

  • scold — [v] find fault with abuse, admonish, asperse, berate, blame, castigate, cavil, censure, chasten, chide, criticize, denounce, disparage, dress down*, expostulate, give a talking to*, jump on*, keep aft*, lay down the law*, lecture, light into*,… …   New thesaurus

  • scold — ► VERB ▪ angrily remonstrate with or rebuke. ► NOUN archaic ▪ a woman who nags or grumbles constantly. ORIGIN probably from an Old Norse word meaning a person who writes and recites epic poems …   English terms dictionary

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