school
I. noun Etymology: Middle English scole, from Old English scōl, from Latin schola, from Greek scholē leisure, discussion, lecture, school; perhaps akin to Greek echein to hold — more at scheme Date: before 12th century 1. an organization that provides instruction: as a. an institution for the teaching of children b. college, university c. (1) a group of scholars and teachers pursuing knowledge together that with similar groups constituted a medieval university (2) one of the four faculties of a medieval university (3) an institution for specialized higher education often associated with a university <
the school of engineering
>
d. an establishment offering specialized instruction <
a secretarial school
>
<
driving schools
>
2. a. (1) the process of teaching or learning especially at a school (2) attendance at a school (3) a session of a school b. a school building c. the students attending a school; also its teachers and students 3. a source of knowledge <
experience was his school
>
4. a. a group of persons who hold a common doctrine or follow the same teacher (as in philosophy, theology, or medicine) <
the Aristotelian school
>
; also the doctrine or practice of such a group b. a group of artists under a common influence c. a group of persons of similar opinions or behavior; also the shared opinions or behavior of such a group <
other schools of thought
>
5. the regulations governing military drill of individuals or units; also the exercises carried out <
the school of the soldier
>
II. transitive verb Date: 15th century 1. a. to teach or drill in a specific knowledge or skill <
well schooled in languages
>
b. to discipline or habituate to something <
school oneself in patience
>
2. to educate in an institution of learning Synonyms: see teach III. noun Etymology: Middle English scole, from Middle Dutch schole; akin to Old English scolu multitude and probably to Old English scylian to separate — more at skill Date: 15th century a large number of fish or aquatic animals of one kind swimming together IV. intransitive verb Date: 1597 to swim or feed in a school <
bluefish are schooling
>

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • School — School, n. [OE. scole, AS. sc?lu, L. schola, Gr. ? leisure, that in which leisure is employed, disputation, lecture, a school, probably from the same root as ?, the original sense being perhaps, a stopping, a resting. See {Scheme}.] 1. A place… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • school — school1 [sko͞ol] n. [ME scole < OE scol < L schola, school < Gr scholē, leisure, that in which leisure is employed, discussion, philosophy, school < IE base * seĝh , to hold fast, overcome > SCHEME] 1. a place or institution for… …   English World dictionary

  • school — for teaching [OE] and school of fish [14] are different words. The former was borrowed into prehistoric Germanic from medieval Latin scōla, and has since evolved into German schule, Dutch school, Swedish skola, and Danish skole, as well as… …   The Hutchinson dictionary of word origins

  • school — Ⅰ. school [1] ► NOUN 1) an institution for educating children. 2) a day s work at school; lessons. 3) any institution at which instruction is given in a particular discipline. 4) a department or faculty of a university. 5) N. Amer. informal a… …   English terms dictionary

  • school — for teaching [OE] and school of fish [14] are different words. The former was borrowed into prehistoric Germanic from medieval Latin scōla, and has since evolved into German schule, Dutch school, Swedish skola, and Danish skole, as well as… …   Word origins

  • school — [n1] place, system for educating academy, alma mater, blackboard*, college, department, discipline, establishment, faculty, hall, halls of ivy*, institute, institution, jail*, schoolhouse, seminary, university; concepts 287,289 school [n2]… …   New thesaurus

  • School — School, n. [For shoal a crowd; prob. confused with school for learning.] A shoal; a multitude; as, a school of fish. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • School — School, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Schooled}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Schooling}.] 1. To train in an institution of learning; to educate at a school; to teach. [1913 Webster] He s gentle, never schooled, and yet learned. Shak. [1913 Webster] 2. To tutor; to… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • School — «School» Canción de Nirvana LP Bleach Publicación 15 de junio de 1989 …   Wikipedia Español

  • school — school, schooling Both an institution and a method of education. A process of learning and management of socially approved knowledge, involving an approved curriculum and pedagogy, paid professional educators, compulsory attendance of pupils, and …   Dictionary of sociology

  • school — school, shoal The two words are of the same Middle Dutch origin and are used with the same meaning of large numbers of fish and other sea animals swimming together. They are unrelated to the more familiar word school, which is derived from Latin… …   Modern English usage

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