I. verb Etymology: Middle English rosten, from Anglo-French rostir, of Germanic origin; akin to Old High German rōsten to roast Date: 13th century transitive verb 1. a. to cook by exposing to dry heat (as in an oven or before a fire) or by surrounding with hot embers, sand, or stones <
roast a potato in ashes
b. to dry and parch by exposure to heat <
roast coffee beans
2. to heat (inorganic material) with access of air and without fusing to effect change (as expulsion of volatile matter, oxidation, or removal of sulfur from sulfide ores) 3. to heat to excess <
roasted by the summer sun
4. to subject to severe criticism or ridicule <
films have been roasted by most critics — H. J. Seldes
5. to honor (a person) at a roast intransitive verb 1. to cook food by heat 2. to undergo being roasted II. noun Date: 14th century 1. a piece of meat suitable for roasting 2. a gathering at which food is roasted before an open fire or in hot ashes or sand 3. an act or process of roasting; specifically severe banter or criticism 4. a banquet honoring a person (as a celebrity) who is subjected to humorous tongue-in-cheek ridicule by friends III. adjective Date: 14th century that has been roasted <
roast beef

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • roast — roast, roasted Meats and things associated with them are normally described as roast: roast beef, roast lamb, roast meat, roast potatoes, etc. (but a roasted chicken and a well roasted joint are also possible), whereas nuts are normally called… …   Modern English usage

  • Roast — Roast, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Roasted}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Roasting}.] [OE. rosten, OF. rostir, F. r[^o]tir; of German origin; cf. OHG. r[=o]sten, G. r[ o]sten, fr. OHG. r[=o]st, r[=o]sta, gridiron, G. rost; cf. AS. hyrstan to roast.] 1. To cook by… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • roast — [rōst] vt. [ME rosten < OFr rostir < Frank * raustjan, akin to OHG rosten < rost, gridiron, roast] 1. to cook (something) with little or no moisture, as in an oven, over an open fire, or in hot embers [to roast a chicken, an ox, an ear… …   English World dictionary

  • Roast — Roast, n. That which is roasted; a piece of meat which has been roasted, or is suitable for being roasted. [1913 Webster] A fat swan loved he best of any roost [roast]. Chaucer. [1913 Webster] {To rule the roast}, to be at the head of affairs.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Roast — Roast, a. [For roasted.] Roasted; as, roast beef. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Roast — Roast, v. i. 1. To cook meat, fish, etc., by heat, as before the fire or in an oven. [1913 Webster] He could roast, and seethe, and broil, and fry. Chaucer. [1913 Webster] 2. To undergo the process of being roasted. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • roast — (v.) c.1300, from O.Fr. rostir, from Frankish *hraustjan (Cf. O.H.G. rosten, M.Du. roosten to roast ), from the same source as ROSTER (Cf. roster). The meaning make fun of in an affectionate way is from 1710. Related: Roasted; roasting. The noun… …   Etymology dictionary

  • roast — roast·er; roast·ing·ly; roast; …   English syllables

  • roast — ► VERB 1) (with reference to food, especially meat) cook or be cooked by prolonged exposure to heat in an oven or over a fire. 2) process (a foodstuff) by subjecting it to intense heat. 3) make or become very warm. 4) criticize or reprimand… …   English terms dictionary

  • roast — BEEF s.n. v. rosbif. Trimis de LauraGellner, 13.09.2007. Sursa: DN …   Dicționar Român

  • roast — roast1 [rəust US roust] v [I and T] [Date: 1200 1300; : Old French; Origin: rostir] 1.) to cook something, such as meat, in an ↑oven or over a fire, or to cook in this way →↑grill, bake ↑bake ▪ Are you going to roast the chicken? ▪ the delicious… …   Dictionary of contemporary English

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