rebound
I. verb Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French rebundir, from re- + Old French bondir to bound — more at bound Date: 14th century intransitive verb 1. a. to spring back on or as if on collision or impact with another body b. to recover from setback or frustration 2. reecho 3. to gain possession of a rebound in basketball transitive verb to cause to rebound • rebounder noun II. noun Date: 1530 1. a. the action of rebounding ; recoil b. an upward leap or movement ; recovery <
a sharp rebound in prices
>
2. a. a basketball or hockey puck that rebounds b. the act or an instance of gaining possession of a basketball rebound <
leads the league in rebounds
>
3. a reaction to setback, frustration, or crisis <
on the rebound from an unhappy love affair
>

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • rebound — re‧bound [rɪˈbaʊnd] verb [intransitive] to increase or grow again after decreasing: • signs that the economy will rebound next year • Stock prices rebounded from Wednesday s steep slide. rebound noun [countable] : • He forecasts a strong rebound… …   Financial and business terms

  • Rebound — can refer to:* Rebound (sports), in sports, refers to the ball becoming freely available after a failed attempt to put it into the goal ** Rebound (basketball), the act of successfully gaining possession of the basketball in such a scenario… …   Wikipedia

  • Rebound! — Origin Sweden Genres Pop, R B Years active 2010 April 2010 Labels Sony Music Website …   Wikipedia

  • rebound — rebound, redound 1. Rebound is pronounced with the stress on the first syllable as a noun and with the stress on the second syllable as a verb. 2. The image with the verb rebound is of something bouncing back, and with redound it is of a tide or… …   Modern English usage

  • Rebound — (englisch für Abprall, Rückprall oder abprallen, zurückprallen) steht für: das Fangen des Balls nach einem missglückten Korbversuch, siehe Rebound (Basketball) Effekte, die das Einsparpotenzial von Effizienzmaßnahmen reduzieren oder ganz… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • rebound — ► VERB 1) bounce back after hitting a hard surface. 2) recover in value, amount, or strength. 3) (rebound on/upon) have an unexpected adverse consequence for. ► NOUN 1) a ball or shot that rebounds. 2) an instance of recovering in value, amount,… …   English terms dictionary

  • rebound — [ri bound′; ] also, and for vi. 4 & n. usually [, rē′bound΄] vi. [ME rebounden < OFr rebondir] 1. to bound back; spring back upon impact with something 2. to reecho or reverberate 3. to leap or spring, as in recovery [his spirits rebounded ] ☆ …   English World dictionary

  • rebound — rebound, reverberate, recoil, resile, repercuss are comparable when they mean to spring back to an original position or shape. Rebound basically implies a springing back after a collision or impact {the ball readily rebounds when thrown against a …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • Rebound — Re*bound , n. 1. The act of rebounding; resilience. [1913 Webster] Flew . . . back, as from a rock, with swift rebound. Dryden. [1913 Webster] 2. recovery, as from sickness, psychological shock, or disappointment. [PJC] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Rebound — Re*bound (r[ e]*bound ), v. i. [Pref. re + bound: cf. F. rebondir.] 1. To spring back; to start back; to be sent back or reverberated by elastic force on collision with another body; as, a rebounding echo. [1913 Webster] Bodies which are… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Rebound — Re*bound , v. t. To send back; to reverberate. [1913 Webster] Silenus sung; the vales his voice rebound. Dryden. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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