pull
I. verb Etymology: Middle English, from Old English pullian; akin to Middle Low German pulen to shell, cull Date: before 12th century transitive verb 1. a. to exert force upon so as to cause or tend to cause motion toward the force b. to stretch (cooling candy) repeatedly <
pull taffy
>
c. to strain abnormally <
pull a tendon
>
d. to hold back (a racehorse) from winning e. to work (an oar) by drawing back strongly 2. a. to draw out from the skin <
pull feathers from a rooster's tail
>
b. to pluck from a plant or by the roots <
pull flowers
>
<
pull turnips
>
c. extract <
pull a tooth
>
3. to hit (a ball) toward the left from a right-handed swing or toward the right from a left-handed swing — compare push 4. to draw apart ; rend, tear 5. to print (as a proof) by impression 6. to remove from a place or situation <
pull the engine
>
<
pulled the pitcher in the third inning
>
<
pulled the show
>
7. to bring (a weapon) into the open <
pulled a knife
>
8. a. perform, carry out <
pull an all-nighter
>
<
pull guard duty
>
b. commit, perpetrate <
pull a robbery
>
<
pull a prank
>
9. a. put on, assume <
pull a grin
>
b. to act or behave in the manner of <
pulled a Horace Greely and went west — Steve Rushin
>
10. a. to draw the support or attention of ; attract <
pull votes
>
— often used with in b. obtain, secure <
pulled a B in the course
>
11. to demand or obtain an advantage over someone by the assertion of <
pull rank
>
intransitive verb 1. a. to use force in drawing, dragging, or tugging b. to move especially through the exercise of mechanical energy <
the car pulled clear of the rut
>
c. (1) to take a drink (2) to draw hard in smoking <
pulled at a pipe
>
d. to strain against the bit 2. to draw a gun 3. to admit of being pulled 4. to feel or express strong sympathy ; root <
pulling for my team to win
>
5. of an offensive lineman in football to move back from the line of scrimmage and toward one flank to provide blocking for a ballcarrier • puller noun II. noun Usage: often attributive Date: 14th century 1. a. the act or an instance of pulling b. (1) a draft of liquid (2) an inhalation of smoke c. the effort expended in moving <
a long pull uphill
>
d. force required to overcome resistance to pulling <
a trigger with a four pound pull
>
2. a. advantage b. special influence 3. proof 6a 4. a device for pulling something or for operating by pulling <
a drawer pull
>
5. a force that attracts, compels, or influences ; attraction 6. an injury resulting from abnormal straining or stretching <
a muscle pull
>
<
a groin pull
>

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • pull — pull …   Dictionnaire des rimes

  • pull — [ pyl ] n. m. • 1930; abrév. de pull over ♦ Pull over. Un pull jacquard. Pull chaussette, moulant, à côtes très serrées. Pull à col roulé, à col en V. Des pulls ras du cou. Pull de coton à manches courtes. ⇒aussi sous pull. Pull et gilet. ⇒ twin… …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • pull — ► VERB 1) exert force on (something) so as to move it towards oneself or the origin of the force. 2) remove by pulling. 3) informal bring out (a weapon) for use. 4) move steadily: the bus pulled away. 5) move oneself with effort or against… …   English terms dictionary

  • Pull — over « Pull » redirige ici. Pour les autres significations, voir Pull (homonymie) …   Wikipédia en Français

  • pull — [pool] vt. [ME pullen < OE pullian, to pluck, snatch with the fingers: ? akin to MLowG pull, a husk, shell] 1. to exert force or influence on so as to cause to move toward or after the source of the force; drag, tug, draw, attract, etc. 2. a)… …   English World dictionary

  • Pull — Pull, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Pulled}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Pulling}.] [AS. pullian; cf. LG. pulen, and Gael. peall, piol, spiol.] 1. To draw, or attempt to draw, toward one; to draw forcibly. [1913 Webster] Ne er pull your hat upon your brows. Shak.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Pull — Pull, n. 1. The act of pulling or drawing with force; an effort to move something by drawing toward one. [1913 Webster] I awakened with a violent pull upon the ring which was fastened at the top of my box. Swift. [1913 Webster] 2. A contest; a… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • pull — vb Pull, draw, drag, haul, hale, tug, tow mean to cause to move in the direction determined by the person or thing that exerts force. Pull, the general term, is often accompanied by an adverb or adverbial phrase to indicate the direction {two… …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • Pull — Pull, v. i. To exert one s self in an act or motion of drawing or hauling; to tug; as, to pull at a rope. [1913 Webster] {To pull apart}, to become separated by pulling; as, a rope will pull apart. {To pull up}, to draw the reins; to stop; to… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • pull — pu̇l vt 1) EXTRACT (1) <pull a tooth> 2) to strain or stretch abnormally <pull a tendon> <pull a muscle> pull n an injury resulting from abnormal straining or stretching esp. of a muscle see GROIN PULL * * * (p l) 1. to …   Medical dictionary

  • Pull — (englisch ‚ziehen oder Zug‘) steht als Gegensatz von Push für: Pull Medien Pull Marketing Pull Systeme in der Produktionsplanung und steuerung einen speziellen Schlag beim Golf, siehe Golfschlag#Flugbahnen …   Deutsch Wikipedia

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