I. verb (plied; plying) Etymology: Middle English plien, short for applien to apply Date: 14th century transitive verb 1. a. to use or wield diligently <
busily plying his pen
b. to practice or perform diligently <
ply a trade
2. to keep furnishing or supplying something to <
plied us with liquor
3. a. to make a practice of rowing or sailing over or on <
the boat plies the river
b. to go or travel regularly over, on, or through <
jets plying the skies
intransitive verb 1. to apply oneself steadily 2. to go or travel regularly II. noun (plural plies) Etymology: 3ply Date: 1532 1. a. one of several layers (as of cloth) usually sewn or laminated together b. one of the strands in a yarn c. one of the veneer sheets forming plywood d. a layer of a paper or cardboard 2. inclination, bias III. transitive verb (plied; plying) Etymology: Middle English plien to fold, from Anglo-French plier, pleier, from Latin plicare; akin to Old High German flehtan to braid, Latin plectere, Greek plekein Date: circa 1909 to twist together <
ply two single yarns

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.


Look at other dictionaries:

  • ply — [plaɪ] verb plied PTandPP JOURNALISM 1. [transitive] to sell something: • 60 retailers were plying their products on the radio. 2. ply your trade to work at your job or business: • two outdoor …   Financial and business terms

  • Ply — Ply, n. [Cf. F. pli, fr. plier. See {Ply}, v.] 1. A fold; a plait; a turn or twist, as of a cord. Arbuthnot. [1913 Webster] 2. Bent; turn; direction; bias. [1913 Webster] The late learners can not so well take the ply. Bacon. [1913 Webster]… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Ply — Ply, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Plied}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Plying}.] [OE. plien, F. plier to fold, to bend, fr. L. plicare; akin to Gr. ?, G. flechten. Cf. {Apply}, {Complex}, {Display}, {Duplicity}, {Employ}, {Exploit}, {Implicate}, {Plait}, {Pliant},… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • ply — Ⅰ. ply [1] ► NOUN (pl. plies) 1) a thickness or layer of a folded or laminated material. 2) each of a number of multiple layers or strands of which something is made. ORIGIN French pli fold , from Latin plicare to fold . Ⅱ. pl …   English terms dictionary

  • Ply — Ply, v. i. 1. To bend; to yield. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] It would rather burst atwo than plye. Chaucer. [1913 Webster] The willow plied, and gave way to the gust. L Estrange. [1913 Webster] 2. To act, go, or work diligently and steadily; especially …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • ply — ply1 [plī] vt. plied, plying [ME plien < OFr plier < L plicare, to fold < IE base * plek , to entwine > FLAX] Now Rare to bend, twist, fold, or mold vi. Obs. to bend or submit n. pl. plies [MFr pli < the v.] 1 …   English World dictionary

  • ply — I verb busy oneself with, carry on, devote oneself to, do work with, employ, engage in, exercere, exercise, exploit, handle, make use of, manipulate, occupy oneself with, operate, persevere at, practice, pursue, put in practice, put into effect,… …   Law dictionary

  • ply — vb *handle, manipulate, wield, swing Analogous words: exercise, *practice, drill: operate, work, function (see ACT vb): manage, direct, control, *conduct …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • ply — [v] use, work at carry on, dispense, employ, exercise, exert, follow, function, handle, maneuver, manipulate, practice, pursue, put out, swing, throw, utilize, wield; concepts 100,225 Ant. be lazy, idle …   New thesaurus

  • ply — am·ply; ap·ply; crum·ply; dim·ply; du·ply; im·ply; mul·ti·ply·ing; pan·o·ply; pim·ply; ply·er; ply·gain; ply·mo·the·an; ply·mo·thi·an; ply; pop·ply; pur·ply; quad·ru·ply; quin·tu·ply; rip·ply; rum·ply; sim·ply; stip·ply; tip·ply; tri·ply;… …   English syllables

  • ply — ply1 [plaı] v past tense and past participle plied present participle plying third person singular plies [Date: 1300 1400; Origin: apply] 1.) ply your trade literary to work at your business, especially buying and selling things on the street ▪… …   Dictionary of contemporary English

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