plenty
I. noun Etymology: Middle English plente, from Anglo-French plenté, from Late Latin plenitat-, plenitas, from Latin, fullness, from plenus full — more at full Date: 13th century 1. a. a full or more than adequate amount or supply <
had plenty of time to finish the job
>
b. a large number or amount <
in plenty of trouble
>
2. the quality or state of being copious ; plentifulness II. adjective Date: 14th century 1. plentiful in amount, number, or supply <
if reasons were as plenty as blackberries — Shakespeare
>
2. ample <
plenty work to be done — Time
>
Usage: Many commentators object to use of sense 2 in writing; it appears to be limited chiefly to spoken English. Sense 1 is literary but is no longer in common use. III. adverb Date: 1842 more than sufficiently ; to a considerable degree <
the nights were plenty cold — F. B. Gipson
>
Usage: Many handbooks advise avoiding the adverb plenty in writing; “use very, quite, or a more precise word,” they advise. Actually plenty is often a more precise word than its recommended replacements; very, fully, or quite will not work as well in these typical quotations <
it's already plenty hot for us in the kitchen without some dolt opening the oven — C. H. Bridges
>
<
may not be rising quite as rapidly as other health costs, but it is going up plenty fast — Changing Times
>
. It is not used in more formal writing.

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • plenty — is essentially a noun, and is used either by itself or with of + following noun (plural, or singular mass noun): We have plenty / You will find plenty of books / There is plenty of time. Use of plenty as an adjective without of is found in… …   Modern English usage

  • Plenty — may refer to:*Plenty (play), a play by David Hare *Plenty (film), a 1985 film directed by Fred Schepisi *Plenty (magazine), an environmental culture magazine *Plenty O Toole, a Bond girl in the 1971 James Bond film Diamonds Are Forever *Plenty… …   Wikipedia

  • Plenty — ist Ortsname von: Plenty (Victoria), Australien Plenty (Tasmanien), Australien Bay of Plenty, Neuseeland Plenty steht für: Plenty (Zeitschrift) Plenty ist: der englische Originaltitel des Films Eine demanzipierte Frau Siehe auch Plenty River …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Plenty — Plen ty, n.; pl. {Plenties}, in Shak. [OE. plentee, plente, OF. plent[ e], fr. L. plenitas, fr. plenus full. See {Full}, a., and cf. {Complete}.] Full or adequate supply; enough and to spare; sufficiency; specifically, abundant productiveness of… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • plenty — [plen′tē] n. pl. plenties [ME plente < MFr plenté < L plenitas < plenus, FULL1] 1. prosperity; opulence 2. a plentiful or abundant supply; enough or more than enough 3. a large number; multitude [plenty of errors] adj …   English World dictionary

  • Plenty — Plen ty, a. Plentiful; abundant. [Obs. or Colloq.] [1913 Webster] If reasons were as plenty as blackberries. Shak. (Folio ed.) [1913 Webster] Those countries where shrubs are plenty. Goldsmith. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Plenty — Plenty, Bai an der Ostküste der Neuseelandinsel Eaheinomauwe (Polynesien) …   Pierer's Universal-Lexikon

  • plenty — index overage, plethora, prosperity, quantity, quorum, store (depository), sufficiency, surfeit …   Law dictionary

  • plenty — (n.) early 13c., from O.Fr. plentet (12c., Mod.Fr. dial. plenté), from L. plenitatem (nom. plenitas) fullness, from plenus complete, full (see PLENARY (Cf. plenary)). The colloquial adverb meaning very much is first attested 1842 …   Etymology dictionary

  • Plenty —    Mélodrame de Fred Schepisi, d après la pièce de David Hare, avec Meryl Streep, Sam Neill, Charles Dance.   Pays: États Unis   Date de sortie: 1985   Technique: couleurs   Durée: 1 h 50    Résumé    Une Anglaise traverse les vicissitudes de l… …   Dictionnaire mondial des Films

  • plenty — ► PRONOUN ▪ a large or sufficient amount or quantity. ► NOUN ▪ a situation in which food and other necessities are available in sufficiently large quantities. ► ADVERB informal ▪ fully; sufficiently. ORIGIN Old French plente, from Latin plenus… …   English terms dictionary

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