pink
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Middle Dutch pinke Date: 15th century a ship with a narrow overhanging stern — called also pinkie II. noun Etymology: origin unknown Date: 1573 1. any of a genus (Dianthus of the family Caryophyllaceae, the pink family) of chiefly Eurasian herbs having usually pink, red, or white flowers 2. a. the very embodiment ; paragon b. (1) one dressed in the height of fashion (2) elite c. highest degree possible ; height <
keep their house in the pink of repair — Rebecca West
>
III. noun Date: 1678 1. any of a group of colors bluish red to red in hue, of medium to high lightness, and of low to moderate saturation 2. a. the scarlet color of a fox hunter's coat; also a fox hunter's coat of this color b. pink-colored clothing c. plural light-colored trousers formerly worn by army officers 3. pinko IV. adjective Date: 1720 1. of the color pink 2. holding moderately radical and usually socialistic political or economic views 3. emotionally moved ; excited — often used as an intensive <
tickled pink
>
pinkness noun V. transitive verb Etymology: Middle English, to thrust Date: 1503 1. a. to perforate in an ornamental pattern b. to cut a saw-toothed edge on 2. a. pierce, stab b. to wound by irony, criticism, or ridicule

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

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  • Pink — ist der Name: einer Farbe, siehe Pink (Farbe) einer Sängerin aus den USA, siehe Pink (Sängerin) einer privaten serbischen Sendergruppe, siehe Pink International einer Stadt in Oklahoma (USA), siehe Pink (Oklahoma) der Hauptrolle in dem Album bzw …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Pink — Pink, n. [Perh. akin to pick; as if the edges of the petals were picked out. Cf. {Pink}, v. t.] 1. (Bot.) A name given to several plants of the caryophyllaceous genus {Dianthus}, and to their flowers, which are sometimes very fragrant and often… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • pink — pink; pink·een; pink·en; pink·er; pink·ify; pink·i·ly; pink·i·ness; pink·ish; pink·ly; pink·ster; pre·pink; pink·ish·ness; pink·ness; …   English syllables

  • Pink — Pink, a. Resembling the garden pink in color; of the color called pink (see 6th {Pink}, 2); as, a pink dress; pink ribbons. [1913 Webster] {Pink eye} (Med.), a popular name for an epidemic variety of ophthalmia, associated with early and marked… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • pink — Ⅰ. pink [1] ► ADJECTIVE 1) of a colour intermediate between red and white, as of coral or salmon. 2) informal, often derogatory left wing. 3) relating to or associated with homosexuals: the pink economy. ► NOUN 1) pink colour, pigment, or… …   English terms dictionary

  • pink — pink1 [piŋk] n. [< ?] 1. any of a genus (Dianthus) of annual and perennial plants of the pink family with white, pink, or red flowers, often clove scented 2. the flower 3. its pale red color 4. [see FLOWER, n. 3] the …   English World dictionary

  • Pink — Pink, n. [D. pink.] (Naut.) A vessel with a very narrow stern; called also {pinky}. Sir W. Scott. [1913 Webster] {Pink stern} (Naut.), a narrow stern. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Pink — Pink, OK U.S. town in Oklahoma Population (2000): 1165 Housing Units (2000): 466 Land area (2000): 25.953547 sq. miles (67.219375 sq. km) Water area (2000): 0.000000 sq. miles (0.000000 sq. km) Total area (2000): 25.953547 sq. miles (67.219375 sq …   StarDict's U.S. Gazetteer Places

  • pink — [n1/adj] rose color blush, coral, flush, fuchsia, rose, roseate, salmon; concept 622 pink [n2] best condition acme*, best, bloom*, fitness, good health, height*, peak, perfection, prime, summit, trim*, verdure; concepts 316,388 Ant. poor health,… …   New thesaurus

  • Pink — Pink, v. i. [D. pinken, pinkoogen, to blink, twinkle with the eyes.] To wink; to blink. [Obs.] L Estrange. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Pink — Pink, a. Half shut; winking. [Obs.] Shak. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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