pass
I. verb Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French passer, from Vulgar Latin *passare, from Latin passus step — more at pace Date: 13th century intransitive verb 1. move, proceed, go 2. a. to go away ; depart b. die — often used with on 3. a. to move in a path so as to approach and continue beyond something ; move past; especially to move past another vehicle going in the same direction b. to run the normal course — used of time or a period of time <
the hours pass quickly
>
4. a. to go or make one's way through <
allow no one to pass
>
b. to go uncensured, unchallenged, or seemingly unnoticed <
let the remark pass
>
5. to go from one quality, state, or form to another <
passes from a liquid to a gaseous state
>
6. a. to sit in inquest or judgment b. (1) to render a decision, verdict, or opinion <
the court passed on the legality of wiretapping
>
(2) to become legally rendered <
judgment passed for the plaintiff
>
7. to go from the control, ownership, or possession of one person or group to that of another <
the throne passed to the king's son
>
<
title passes to the buyer upon payment in full
>
8. a. happen, occur b. to take place or be exchanged as or in a social, personal, or business interaction <
words passed
>
9. a. to become approved by a legislature or body empowered to sanction or reject <
the proposal passed
>
b. to undergo an inspection, test, or course of study successfully 10. a. to serve as a medium of exchange b. to be accepted or regarded <
drivel that passes for literature
>
c. to identify oneself or be identified as something one is not <
tried to pass as an adult
>
<
Mom could pass as my sister
>
11. a. obsolete to make a pass in fencing b. to throw or hit a ball or puck to a teammate — often used with off 12. a. (1) to decline to bid, double, or redouble in a card game (2) to withdraw from the current poker pot b. to let something go by without accepting or taking advantage of it — often used with on <
passed on the cheesecake
>
<
thanks for the offer, but I'll pass
>
transitive verb 1. to go beyond: as a. surpass, exceed <
passes all expectations
>
b. to advance or develop beyond c. to go past (one moving in the same direction) 2. a. to go by ; proceed or extend beyond <
pass the school on their way to work
>
b. (1) obsolete ; neglect, omit (2) ; to omit a regularly scheduled declaration and payment of (a dividend) 3. a. to go across, over, or through ; cross b. to live through (as an experience or peril) ; undergo c. to go through (as a test) successfully 4. a. to secure the approval of <
the bill passed the Senate
>
b. to cause or permit to win approval or legal or official sanction <
pass a law
>
c. to give approval or a passing grade to <
pass the students
>
5. a. to let (as time or a period of time) go by especially while involved in a leisure activity <
I'll read to pass the time
>
b. to let go unnoticed ; overlook, disregard 6. a. pledge b. to transfer the right to or property in <
pass title to a house
>
7. a. to put in circulation <
pass bad checks
>
b. (1) to transfer or transmit from one to another <
pass the salt
>
<
passing the savings on to customers
>
(2) to relay or communicate (as information) to another c. to cause or enable to go ; transport d. to throw or hit (a ball or puck) especially to a teammate 8. a. to pronounce (as a sentence or opinion) especially judicially b. utter <
passed a cutting remark
>
9. a. to cause or permit to go past or through a barrier b. to move or cause to move in a particular manner or direction <
passed my hand over my face
>
<
pass the rope through the loop
>
c. to cause to march or go by in order <
pass the troops in review
>
10. to emit or discharge from a bodily part and especially the bowels 11. a. to give a base on balls to b. to hit a ball past (an opponent) in a game (as tennis) • passer noun II. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French pas, from Latin passus Date: 14th century 1. a means (as an opening, road, or channel) by which a barrier may be passed or access to a place may be gained; especially a low place in a mountain range 2. a position to be held usually against odds III. noun Etymology: 1pass Date: 1523 1. realization <
brought his dream to pass
>
2. the act or an instance of passing ; passage 3. a usually distressing or bad state of affairs <
what has brought you to such a pass?
>
4. a. a written permission to move about freely in a place or to leave or enter it b. a written leave of absence from a military post or station for a brief period c. a permit or ticket allowing free transportation or free admission 5. archaic a thrust or lunge in fencing 6. a. a transference of objects by sleight of hand or other deceptive means b. a moving of the hands over or along something 7. archaic an ingenious sally (as of wit) 8. the passing of an examination or course of study; also the mark or certification of such passing 9. a single complete mechanical operation; also a single complete cycle of operations (as for processing, manufacturing, or printing) 10. a. (1) a transfer of a ball or a puck from one player to another on the same team (2) a ball or puck so transferred b. passing shot 11. base on balls 12. an election not to bid, bet, or draw an additional card in a card game 13. a throw of dice in the game of craps that wins the bet for the shooter — compare crap III,2, missout 14. a single passage or movement (as of an airplane) over a place or toward a target 15. a. effort, try b. a sexually inviting gesture or approach 16. pase IV. abbreviation passenger

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Pass — Pass, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Passed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Passing}.] [F. passer, LL. passare, fr. L. passus step, or from pandere, passum, to spread out, lay open. See {Pace}.] 1. To go; to move; to proceed; to be moved or transferred from one point… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • PASS — vi 1 a: to issue a decision, verdict, or opinion the Supreme Court pass ed on a statute b: to be legally issued judgment pass ed by default 2: to go from the control, ownership, or possession of one person or group to that of …   Law dictionary

  • Pass — Pass, v. t. 1. In simple, transitive senses; as: (a) To go by, beyond, over, through, or the like; to proceed from one side to the other of; as, to pass a house, a stream, a boundary, etc. (b) Hence: To go from one limit to the other of; to… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • pass — Ⅰ. pass [1] ► VERB 1) move or go onward, past, through, or across. 2) change from one state or condition to another. 3) transfer (something) to someone. 4) kick, hit, or throw (the ball) to a teammate. 5) (of time) go by. 6) …   English terms dictionary

  • pass — [n1] opening through solid canyon, cut, gap, gorge, passage, passageway, path, ravine; concepts 509,513 Ant. closing, closure pass [n2] authorization, permission admission, chit*, comp, free ride*, furlough, identification, license, order, paper …   New thesaurus

  • pass — pass1 [pas, päs] n. [ME pas: see PACE1] a narrow passage or opening, esp. between mountains; gap; defile pass2 [pas, päs] vi. [ME passen < OFr passer < VL * passare < L passus, a step: see PACE1] 1. to go o …   English World dictionary

  • Pass — Pass, n. [Cf. F. pas (for sense 1), and passe, fr. passer to pass. See {Pass}, v. i.] 1. An opening, road, or track, available for passing; especially, one through or over some dangerous or otherwise impracticable barrier; a passageway; a defile; …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Pass — (von französisch passer „überschreiten“) bezeichnet: Reisepass, einen amtlichen Identitätsausweis zur Legitimation bei Auslandsreisen Pass (Sport), das gezielte Übergeben des Sportgerätes im Sport eine Schaltung, um bestimmte Signalanteile… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • PASS — Cette page d’homonymie répertorie les différents sujets et articles partageant un même nom …   Wikipédia en Français

  • pass# — pass vb Pass, pass away, elapse, expire mean to move or come to a termination or end. Pass and pass away imply gradual or gentle movement to another state or condition; they often imply a transition from life to death but they may suggest a… …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • Pass — »amtliches Dokument, das der Legitimation (im Ausland) dient; Übergang über einen Gebirgskamm, enger Durchgang; Zuspiel, Vorlage (im Ballspiel); Passgang, Gangart von Vierbeinern«; Quelle dieses Wortes ist letztlich lat. passus »Schritt«… …   Das Herkunftswörterbuch

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