mole
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English māl; akin to Old High German meil spot Date: 14th century a pigmented spot, mark, or small permanent protuberance on the human body; especially nevus II. noun Etymology: Middle English; akin to Middle Low German mol Date: 14th century 1. any of numerous burrowing insectivores (especially family Talpidae) with tiny eyes, concealed ears, and soft fur 2. one who works in the dark 3. a machine for tunneling 4. a spy (as a double agent) who establishes a cover long before beginning espionage; broadly one within an organization who passes on information III. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Latin mola mole, literally, mill, millstone — more at mill Date: 15th century an abnormal mass in the uterus especially when containing fetal tissues IV. noun Etymology: Middle French, from Old Italian molo, from Late Greek mōlos, from Latin moles, literally, mass, exertion; akin to Greek mōlos exertion Date: circa 1548 1. a massive work formed of masonry and large stones or earth laid in the sea as a pier or breakwater 2. the harbor formed by a mole V. noun also mol Etymology: German Mol, short for Molekulargewicht molecular weight, from molekular molecular + Gewicht weight Date: 1902 the base unit of amount of pure substance in the International System of Units that contains the same number of elementary entities as there are atoms in exactly 12 grams of the isotope carbon 12 VI. noun Etymology: Mexican Spanish, from Nahuatl mōlli sauce Date: 1901 a spicy sauce made with chilies and usually chocolate and served with meat

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • môle — môle …   Dictionnaire des rimes

  • Mole — Mole …   Deutsch Wörterbuch

  • Molé — Mole Cette page d’homonymie répertorie les différents sujets et articles partageant un même nom.  Pour l’article homophone, voir Maul. Mole …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Môle — Mole Cette page d’homonymie répertorie les différents sujets et articles partageant un même nom.  Pour l’article homophone, voir Maul. Mole …   Wikipédia en Français

  • mole — [ mɔl ] n. f. • 1903; de l all., de Molekül « molécule » ♦ Métrol. Unité de quantité de matière (symb.mol) équivalant à la quantité de matière d un système contenant autant d entités élémentaires qu il y a d atomes dans 0,012 kg de carbone 12 (⇒… …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • môle — mole [ mɔl ] n. f. • 1903; de l all., de Molekül « molécule » ♦ Métrol. Unité de quantité de matière (symb.mol) équivalant à la quantité de matière d un système contenant autant d entités élémentaires qu il y a d atomes dans 0,012 kg de carbone… …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • môle — 1. (mô l ) s. f. 1°   Terme de médecine. Embryon informe consistant en un simple sac cutané, sans organes distincts, renfermant quelquefois des portions d os, des dents, etc. Ces môles sont quelquefois appelées vraies môles ou môles légitimes.… …   Dictionnaire de la Langue Française d'Émile Littré

  • Mole — Mole, n. [OE. molle, either shortened fr. moldwerp, or from the root of E. mold soil: cf. D. mol, OD. molworp. See {Moldwarp}.] 1. (Zo[ o]l.) Any insectivore of the family {Talpid[ae]}. They have minute eyes and ears, soft fur, and very large and …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Mole — des Hafens der Insel Portland Mole a …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • MOLE — MOLE, rodent. The only mole found in Israel is the mole rat (Spalax ehrenbergi), a small mammal belonging to the order Rodentia. It is blind, its rudimentary eyes being covered with a membrane. Inhabiting subterranean burrows which it digs, it… …   Encyclopedia of Judaism

  • mole — sustantivo femenino 1. Cosa muy grande y, generalmente, pesada: Destacaba la mole del castillo sobre el monte. Ese pico es una mole que domina la cordillera. 2. Corpulencia o gran volumen de un cuerpo: El elefante era una mole de más de… …   Diccionario Salamanca de la Lengua Española

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