mold
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English molde; akin to Old High German molta soil, Latin molere to grind — more at meal Date: before 12th century 1. crumbling soft friable earth suited to plant growth ; soil; especially soil rich in humus — compare leaf mold 2. dialect British a. the surface of the earth ; ground b. the earth of the burying ground 3. archaic earth that is the substance of the human body <
be merciful great Duke to men of mold — Shakespeare
>
II. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French molde, alteration of Old French modle, from Latin modulus, diminutive of modus measure — more at mete Date: 13th century 1. distinctive nature or character ; type 2. the frame on or around which an object is constructed 3. a. a cavity in which a substance is shaped: as (1) a matrix for casting metal <
a bullet mold
>
(2) a form in which food is given a decorative shape b. a molded object 4. molding 5. a. obsolete an example to be followed b. prototype c. a fixed pattern ; design III. transitive verb Date: 14th century 1. archaic to knead (dough) into a desired consistency or shape 2. to give shape to <
the wind molds the waves
>
3. to form in a mold <
mold candles
>
4. to determine or influence the quality or nature of <
mold public opinion
>
5. to fit the contours of <
fitted skirts that mold the hips
>
6. to ornament with molding or carving <
molded picture frames
>
moldable adjectivemolder noun IV. noun Etymology: Middle English mowlde, perhaps alteration of mowle, from moulen to grow moldy, of Scandinavian origin; akin to Old Danish mul mold Date: 14th century 1. a superficial often woolly growth produced especially on damp or decaying organic matter or on living organisms by a fungus (as of the order Mucorales) 2. a fungus that produces mold V. intransitive verb Date: 1530 to become moldy

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • mold — mold·abil·i·ty; mold·able; mold·i·ness; mold·ing; mold; mold·man; mold·wrap; re·mold; un·mold; mold·er; mold·i·warp; …   English syllables

  • mold — mold1 [mōld] n. [ME moolde < OFr molle, earlier modle < L modulus: see MODULE] 1. a pattern, hollow form, or matrix for giving a certain shape to something in a plastic or molten state 2. a frame, shaped core, etc. on or around which… …   English World dictionary

  • Mold — Mold, Mould Mould, n. [OE. molde, OF. mole, F. moule, fr. L. modulus. See {Model}.] [For spelling, see 2d {Mold}, above.] 1. The matrix, or cavity, in which anything is shaped, and from which it takes its form; also, the body or mass containing… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Mold — Mold, Mould Mould, v. t. [Cf. F. mouler, OF. moler, moller. See {Mold} the matrix.] 1. To form into a particular shape; to shape; to model; to fashion. [1913 Webster] He forgeth and moldeth metals. Sir M. Hale. [1913 Webster] Did I request thee,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Mold — Mold, Mould Mould, n. [OE. molde, AS. molde; akin to D. mul, G. mull, mulm, OHG. molt, molta, Icel. mold, Dan. muld, Sw. mull, Goth. mulda, and E. meal flour. See {Meal}, and cf. {Mole} an animal, {Mull}, v.] [The prevalent spelling is, perhaps,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • mold — Ⅰ. mold [1] (Brit. mould) ► NOUN 1) a hollow container used to give shape to molten or hot liquid material when it cools and hardens. 2) something made in this way, especially a jelly or mousse. 3) a distinctive type, style, or character. ► VERB… …   English terms dictionary

  • Mold — Mold, Mould Mould, n. [From the p. p. of OE. moulen to become moldy, to rot, prob. fr. Icel. mygla to grow musty, mugga mugginess; cf. Sw. m[ o]gla to grow moldy. See {Muggy}, and cf. {Moldy}.] (Bot.) A growth of minute fungi of various kinds,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Mold — Mold, Mould Mould, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Molded} or {Moulded}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Molding} or {Moulding}.] To cover with mold or soil. [R.] [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Mold — Mold, Mould Mould, v. t. To cause to become moldy; to cause mold to grow upon. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Mold — Mold, Mould Mould, v. i. To become moldy; to be covered or filled, in whole or in part, with a mold. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Mold — Mold, n. [See {Mole} a spot.] A spot; a blemish; a mole. [Obs.] Spenser. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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