I. adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Late Latin mediatus intermediate, from past participle of mediare Date: 15th century 1. occupying a middle position 2. a. acting through an intervening agency b. exhibiting indirect causation, connection, or relation • mediacy nounmediately adverb II. verb (-ated; -ating) Etymology: Medieval Latin mediatus, past participle of mediare, from Late Latin, to be in the middle, from Latin medius middle Date: 1568 transitive verb 1. a. to bring accord out of by action as an intermediary b. to effect by action as an intermediary 2. a. to act as intermediary agent in bringing, effecting, or communicating ; convey b. to transmit as intermediate mechanism or agency intransitive verb 1. to interpose between parties in order to reconcile them 2. to reconcile differences Synonyms: see interposemediative adjectivemediatory adjective

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.


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  • mediate — me‧di‧ate [ˈmiːdieɪt] verb [intransitive, transitive] to try to end an argument between two people or groups by talking to both sides and encouraging them to reach an agreement: • He was asked to mediate a labor dispute. mediate between • an… …   Financial and business terms

  • Mediate — Me di*ate, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Mediated}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Mediating}.] [LL. mediatus, p. p. of mediare to mediate. See {Mediate}, a.] [1913 Webster] 1. To be in the middle, or between two; to intervene. [R.] [1913 Webster] 2. To interpose… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Mediate — may refer to: Mediate (song), by INXS Domenic Mediate, professional soccer player Rocco Mediate, professional golfer A common misspelling of the website Mediaite See also Mediation (disambiguation) …   Wikipedia

  • Mediate — Me di*ate, a. [L. mediatus, p. p. of mediare, v. t., to halve, v. i., to be in the middle. See {Mid}, and cf. {Moiety}.] 1. Being between the two extremes; middle; interposed; intervening; intermediate. Prior. [1913 Webster] 2. Acting by means,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Mediate — Me di*ate, v. t. 1. To effect by mediation or interposition; to bring about as a mediator, instrument, or means; as, to mediate a peace. [1913 Webster] 2. To divide into two equal parts. [R.] Holder. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • mediate — I verb adjust, adjust difficulties, arbitrate, arrange differences, bring to an understanding, bring to terms, bring together, compromise, conciliate, effect an agreement, intercede, interfere, intervene, moderate, negotiate, pacem conciliare,… …   Law dictionary

  • mediate — (v.) 1540s, divide in two equal parts, probably a back formation from MEDIATION (Cf. mediation) or MEDIATOR (Cf. mediator), or else from L. mediatus, pp. of mediare. Meaning act as a mediator is from 1610s; that of settle by mediation is from… …   Etymology dictionary

  • mediate — intercede, intervene, *interpose, interfere Analogous words: arbitrate, *judge, adjudge, adjudicate: conciliate, propitiate (see PACIFY): reconcile, accommodate, *adapt …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • mediate — [v] try to bring to an agreement act as middle*, arbitrate, bring to terms, conciliate, deal, go fifty fifty*, intercede, interfere, intermediate, interpose, intervene, make a deal, make peace, meet halfway*, moderate, negotiate, propitiate,… …   New thesaurus

  • mediate — ► VERB 1) try to settle a dispute between two other parties. 2) technical be a medium for (a process or effect). DERIVATIVES mediation noun mediator noun. ORIGIN Latin mediare place in the middle …   English terms dictionary

  • mediate — [mē′dē āt΄; ] for adj. [, mē′dēit] vi. mediated, mediating [< LL mediatus, pp. of mediare, to divide in the middle < L medius, middle: see MID1] 1. to be in an intermediate position or location 2. to be an intermediary or conciliator… …   English World dictionary

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