I. noun Etymology: Middle English lon, from Old Norse lān; akin to Old English lǣn loan, lēon to lend, Latin linquere to leave, Greek leipein Date: 12th century 1. a. money lent at interest b. something lent usually for the borrower's temporary use 2. a. the grant of temporary use b. the temporary duty of a person transferred to another job for a limited time 3. loanword II. transitive verb Date: 13th century lendloanable adjective Usage: The verb loan is one of the words English settlers brought to America and continued to use after it had died out in Britain. Its use was soon noticed by British visitors and somewhat later by the New England literati, who considered it a bit provincial. It was flatly declared wrong in 1870 by a popular commentator, who based his objection on etymology. A later scholar showed that the commentator was ignorant of Old English and thus unsound in his objection, but by then it was too late, as the condemnation had been picked up by many other commentators. Although a surprising number of critics still voice objections, loan is entirely standard as a verb. You should note that it is used only literally; lend is the verb used for figurative expressions, such as “lending a hand” or “lending enchantment.”

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.


Look at other dictionaries:

  • LOAN — (Heb. הַלְוָאָה, halva ah), a transaction in which a thing, usually money, is given by one person, called the malveh ( lender ), to another, called the loveh ( borrower ), for the latter s use and enjoyment, and in order that such thing or its… …   Encyclopedia of Judaism

  • loan — n 1 a: money lent at interest b: something lent usu. for the borrower s temporary use 2: a transfer or delivery of money from one party to another with the express or implied agreement that the sum will be repaid regardless of contingency and usu …   Law dictionary

  • loan — verb. In 19c British English, loan was a standard alternative for lend, but by the time Fowler wrote (1926) loan had been largely driven out by lend, although it has continued in use in AmE. In current use loan is mostly confined to non British… …   Modern English usage

  • Loan — Loan, n. [OE. lone, lane, AS. l[=a]n, l[ae]n, fr. le[ o]n to lend; akin to D. leen loan, fief, G. lehen fief, Icel. l[=a]n, G. leihen to lend, OHG. l[=i]han, Icel. lj[=i], Goth. leihwan, L. linquere to leave, Gr. lei pein, Skr. ric. [root]119. Cf …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • loan — (n.) mid 13c., from O.N. lan, related to lja to lend, from P.Gmc. *laikhwniz (Cf. O.Fris. len thing lent, M.Du. lene, Du. leen loan, fief, O.H.G. lehan, Ger. Lehn fief, feudal tenure ), originally to let have, to leave (to someone), from PIE *lei …   Etymology dictionary

  • LOAN — oder Loan bezeichnet: LOAN, ICAO Code des Flugplatz Wiener Neustadt/Ost Benjamin F. Loan (1819–1881), US amerikanischer Politiker Diese Seite ist eine Begriffsklärung zur Unterscheidung mehrerer mit demselben Wor …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • loan — loan·able; loan; loan·er; loan·ing; …   English syllables

  • loan — ► NOUN 1) a thing that is borrowed, especially a sum of money that is expected to be paid back with interest. 2) the action of lending. ► VERB ▪ give as a loan. ● on loan Cf. ↑on loan DERIVATIVES …   English terms dictionary

  • loan — [lōn] n. [ME lone < ON lān (akin to OE læn, lending, loan, lænan, to lend) < IE base * leikw , to leave behind > L linquere, Gr leipen, Sans riṅákti, (he) leaves] 1. the act of lending, esp. to use for a short time [the loan of a pen] 2 …   English World dictionary

  • Loan — Loan, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Loaned}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Loaning}.] To lend; sometimes with out. Kent. [1913 Webster] By way of location or loaning them out. J. Langley (1644). [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Loan — (l[=o]n), n. [See {Lawn}.] A loanin. [Scot.] [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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