I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English lippa; akin to Old High German leffur lip and probably to Latin labium, labrum lip Date: before 12th century 1. either of two fleshy folds that surround the mouth in humans and many other vertebrates and are organs of human speech essential to certain articulations; also the red or pinkish margin of the human lip 2. slang back talk 3. a. a fleshy edge or margin (as of a wound) b. labium c. labellum 1 d. a limb of a labiate corolla 4. a. the edge of a hollow vessel or cavity b. a projecting edge: as (1) the beveled upper edge of the mouth of an organ flue pipe (2) the sharp cutting edge on the end of a tool (as an auger) (3) a short spout (as on a pitcher) c. edge 2 5. embouchurelipless adjectiveliplike adjective II. adjective Date: 1558 1. insincere <
lip praise
2. produced with the participation of the lips ; labial <
lip consonants
III. verb (lipped; lipping) Date: 1589 transitive verb 1. to touch with the lips; especially kiss 2. utter 3. to lap against ; lick 4. to hit (a putt) so that the ball hits the edge of the cup but fails to drop in — usually used with out intransitive verb to hit the edge of the cup without dropping in — used with out <
the putt lipped out

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

(of the mouth, etc.)

Look at other dictionaries:

  • LIP — LIP; lip·a·rid·i·dae; lip·a·ris; lip·a·rite; lip; lip·id; lip·i·do·plast; lip·i·do·sis; lip·i·do·some; lip·in; lip·less; lip·o·gram; lip·o·gram·mat·ic; lip·o·gram·ma·tism; lip·o·gram·ma·tist; lip·pen; lip·per·ings; lip·pia; lip·pi·ness;… …   English syllables

  • Lip — (l[i^]p), n. [OE. lippe, AS. lippa; akin to D. lip, G. lippe, lefze, OHG. lefs, Dan. l[ae]be, Sw. l[ a]pp, L. labium, labrum. Cf. {Labial}.] 1. One of the two fleshy folds which surround the orifice of the mouth in man and many other animals. In… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • lip — [lip] n. [ME lippe < OE lippa, akin to MDu lippe < IE base * leb , to hang loosely, lip > L labes, a falling, labium, lip] 1. either of the two fleshy folds forming the edges of the mouth 2. anything like a lip, as in structure or in… …   English World dictionary

  • lip — W2 [lıp] n [: Old English; Origin: lippa] 1.) one of the two soft parts around your mouth where your skin is redder or darker upper/lower/top/bottom lip ▪ His bottom lip was swollen. ▪ She had big eyes and full lips (=large and round lips) . ▪… …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • lip — [ lıp ] noun *** 1. ) count one of the two edges that form the top and bottom parts of your mouth: His thin red lips stretched into a smile. 2. ) count the place on the edge of a glass or container where you pour out liquid: Careful, the lip of… …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • Lip- — vor Konsonanten auch Lipo [griech. lípos = Speck]: Bestimmungswort von Zus. mit der Bed. »Fett«. * * * lip , Lip : ↑ lipo , Lipo . * * * lip , Lip : ↑lipo , ↑Lipo . li|po , Li|po , (vor Vokalen auch:) lip …   Universal-Lexikon

  • lip — ► NOUN 1) either of the two fleshy parts forming the edges of the mouth opening. 2) the edge of a hollow container or an opening. 3) informal impudent talk. 4) another term for LABIUM(Cf. ↑labium). ► VERB ▪ (of water) lap a …   English terms dictionary

  • lip- — lip(o) élément, du gr. lipos, graisse . ⇒LIP(O) , (LIP , LIPO )élém. formant I. Élém. tiré du gr. ( ) , de « graisse, corps gras », entrant dans la constr. de subst. et d adj. appartenant notamment à la biol. et à la méd. A. [Le 2e élém. n est… …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • Lip — Lip, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Lipped} (l[i^]pt); p. pr. & vb. n. {Lipping} ( p[i^]ng).] 1. To touch with the lips; to put the lips to; hence, to kiss. [1913 Webster] The bubble on the wine which breaks Before you lip the glass. Praed. [1913 Webster]… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Lip — Lip, v. t. To clip; to trim. [Obs.] Holland. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Lip — Lip: Abk. für ↑ Liponsäure.   Lip(S2): Abk. für ↑ Liponsäure …   Universal-Lexikon

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