light
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English lēoht; akin to Old High German lioht light, Latin luc-, lux light, lucēre to shine, Greek leukos white Date: before 12th century 1. a. something that makes vision possible b. the sensation aroused by stimulation of the visual receptors c. electromagnetic radiation of any wavelength and traveling in a vacuum with a speed of about 186,281 miles (300,000 kilometers) per second; specifically such radiation that is visible to the human eye 2. a. daylight b. dawn 3. a source of light: as a. a celestial body b. candle c. an electric light 4. archaic sight 4a 5. a. spiritual illumination b. inner light c. enlightenment d. truth 6. a. public knowledge <
facts brought to light
>
b. a particular aspect or appearance presented to view <
saw the matter in a different light
>
7. a particular illumination 8. something that enlightens or informs <
shed some light on the problem
>
9. a medium (as a window) through which light is admitted 10. plural a set of principles, standards, or opinions <
worship according to one's lights — Adrienne Koch
>
11. a noteworthy person in a particular place or field <
a leading light among current writers
>
12. a particular expression of the eye 13. a. lighthouse, beacon b. traffic light 14. the representation of light in art 15. a flame for lighting something (as a cigarette) II. adjective Date: before 12th century 1. having light ; bright <
a light airy room
>
2. a. not dark, intense, or swarthy in color or coloring ; pale b. of colors medium in saturation and high in lightness <
light blue
>
3. of coffee served with extra milk or cream III. verb (lit or lighted; lighting) Date: before 12th century intransitive verb 1. to become light ; brighten — usually used with up <
her face lit up
>
2. to take fire 3. to ignite something (as a cigarette) — often used with up transitive verb 1. to set fire to 2. a. to conduct with a light ; guide b. illuminate <
rockets light up the sky
>
c. animate, brighten <
a smile lit up her face
>
IV. adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Old English lēoht; akin to Old High German līhti light, Latin levis, Greek elachys small Date: before 12th century 1. a. having little weight ; not heavy b. designed to carry a comparatively small load <
a light truck
>
c. having relatively little weight in proportion to bulk <
aluminum is a light metal
>
d. containing less than the legal, standard, or usual weight <
a light coin
>
2. a. of little importance ; trivial b. not abundant <
light rain
>
<
a light lunch
>
3. a. easily disturbed <
a light sleeper
>
b. exerting a minimum of force or pressure ; gentle <
a light touch
>
c. resulting from a very slight pressure ; faint <
light print
>
4. a. easily endurable <
a light illness
>
b. requiring little effort <
light work
>
5. capable of moving swiftly or nimbly <
light on his feet
>
6. a. frivolous 1a <
light conduct
>
b. lacking in stability ; changeable <
light opinions
>
c. sexually promiscuous 7. free from care ; cheerful 8. less powerful but usually more mobile than usual for its kind <
light cavalry
>
<
a light cruiser
>
9. a. made with a lower calorie content or with less of some ingredient (as salt, fat, or alcohol) than usual <
light beer
>
<
light salad dressing
>
b. having a relatively mild flavor 10. a. easily digested <
a light soup
>
b. well leavened <
a light crust
>
11. coarse and sandy or easily pulverized <
light soil
>
12. dizzy, giddy <
felt light in the head
>
13. intended chiefly to entertain <
light verse
>
<
light comedy
>
14. a. carrying little or no cargo <
the ship returned light
>
b. producing goods for direct consumption by the consumer <
light industry
>
15. not bearing a stress or accent <
a light syllable
>
16. having a clear soft quality <
a light voice
>
17. being in debt to the pot in a poker game <
three chips light
>
18. short 5d <
light on experience
>
19. casual, occasional <
a light smoker
>
Synonyms: see easylightish adjective V. adverb Date: before 12th century 1. lightly 2. with little baggage <
travel light
>
VI. intransitive verb (lit or lighted; lighting) Etymology: Middle English, from Old English līhtan; akin to Old English lēoht light in weight Date: before 12th century 1. dismount 2. settle, alight <
a bird lit on the lawn
>
3. to fall unexpectedly — usually used with on or upon 4. to arrive by chance ; happen — usually used with on or upon <
lit upon a solution
>

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • light — light1 [līt] n. [ME liht < OE lēoht, akin to Ger licht < IE base * leuk , to shine, bright > Gr leukos, white, L lux & lumen, light, lucere, to shine, luna, moon, Welsh llug, gleam] 1. a) the form of electromagnetic radiation that acts… …   English World dictionary

  • Light — (l[imac]t), n. [OE. light, liht, AS. le[ o]ht; akin to OS. lioht, D. & G. licht, OHG. lioht, Goth. liuha[thorn], Icel. lj[=o]s, L. lux light, lucere to shine, Gr. leyko s white, Skr. ruc to shine. [root]122. Cf. {Lucid}, {Lunar}, {Luminous},… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Light — Light, a. [Compar. {Lighter} (l[imac]t [ e]r); superl. {Lightest}.] [OE. light, liht, AS. l[=i]ht, le[ o]ht; akin to D. ligt, G. leicht, OHG. l[=i]hti, Icel. l[=e]ttr, Dan. let, Sw. l[ a]tt, Goth. leihts, and perh. to L. levis (cf. {Levity}), Gr …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • light — Ⅰ. light [1] ► NOUN 1) the natural agent that stimulates sight and makes things visible; electromagnetic radiation from about 390 to 740 nm in wavelength. 2) a source of illumination. 3) a device producing a flame or spark. 4) (lights) traffic… …   English terms dictionary

  • light — [adj1] illuminated ablaze, aglow, bright, brilliant, burnished, clear, cloudless, flashing, fluorescent, glossy, glowing, lambent, lucent, luminous, lustrous, phosphorescent, polished, radiant, refulgent, resplendent, rich, scintillant, shining,… …   New thesaurus

  • Light — Light, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Lighted} (l[imac]t [e^]d) or {Lit} (l[i^]t); p. pr. & vb. n. {Lighting}.] [AS. l[=y]htan, l[=i]htan, to shine. [root]122. See {Light}, n.] 1. To set fire to; to cause to burn; to set burning; to ignite; to kindle; as,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Light — Light, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Lighted} (l[imac]t [e^]d) or {Lit} (l[i^]t); p. pr. & vb. n. {Lighting}.] [AS. l[=i]htan to alight orig., to relieve (a horse) of the rider s burden, to make less heavy, fr. l[=i]ht light. See {Light} not heavy, and cf …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Light — (l[imac]t), a. [AS. le[ o]ht. See {Light}, n.] [Compar. {Lighter} (l[imac]t [ e]r); superl. {Lightest}.] 1. Having light; not dark or obscure; bright; clear; as, the apartment is light. [1913 Webster] 2. White or whitish; not intense or very… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Light — heißt der Ort Light (Arkansas), Ort in den Vereinigten Staaten Light ist der Familienname folgender Personen: John Light (* 1974), britischer Schauspieler Judith Light (* 1949), US amerikanische Schauspielerin William Light (1786–1839),… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • light — [ lajt ] adj. inv. • 1988; mot angl. « léger; à basses calories » ♦ Anglic. Qui est sucré avec des édulcorants de synthèse. Les boissons light. Qui contient peu de calories; moins de produits nocifs. ⇒ allégé, léger. Cigarettes extra light. light …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • light# — light vb 1 Light, kindle, ignite, fire basically mean to set something burning or on fire. Light (see also ILLUMINATE), when it takes as its subject the agent or agency, usually implies such an end of the action as illumination {she lighted the… …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

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