leave
I. verb (left; leaving) Etymology: Middle English leven, from Old English lǣfan; akin to Old High German verleiben to leave, Old English belīfan to be left over, and perhaps to Lithuanian lipti to adhere, Greek lipos grease, fat Date: before 12th century transitive verb 1. a. (1) bequeath, devise <
left a fortune to his son
>
(2) to have remaining after one's death <
leaves a widow and two children
>
b. to cause to remain as a trace or aftereffect <
oil leaves a stain
>
<
the wound left an ugly scar
>
2. a. to cause or allow to be or remain in a specified condition <
leave the door open
>
<
his manner left me cold
>
b. to fail to include or take along <
left the notes at home
>
<
the movie leaves a lot out
>
c. to have as a remainder <
4 from 7 leaves 3
>
d. to permit to be or remain subject to another's action or control <
just leave everything to me
>
e. let f. to cause or allow to be or remain available <
leave room for expansion
>
<
left myself an out
>
3. a. to go away from ; depart <
leave the room
>
b. desert, abandon <
left his wife
>
c. to terminate association with ; withdraw from <
left school before graduation
>
4. to put, deposit, or deliver before or in the process of departing <
I left a package for you
>
<
leave a message
>
intransitive verb set out, departleaver noun Usage: Leave (sense 2e) with the infinitive but without to <
leave it be
>
is a mostly spoken idiom used in writing especially for humorous effect. It is not often criticized in British English, but American commentators, adhering to an opinion first expressed in 1881, still dislike it. II. noun Etymology: Middle English leve, from Old English lēaf; akin to Middle High German loube permission, Old English alȳfan to allow — more at believe Date: before 12th century 1. a. permission to do something b. authorized especially extended absence from duty or employment 2. an act of leaving ; departure III. intransitive verb (leaved; leaving) Etymology: Middle English leven, from leef leaf Date: 14th century leaf

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • leave — [liːv] noun [uncountable] HUMAN RESOURCES time that you are allowed to be absent from your work: • The company offers attractive benefits, including five weeks leave per year. • The Los Gatos School District has hired 21 new teachers to replace… …   Financial and business terms

  • Leave — Leave, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Left} (l[e^]ft); p. pr. & vb. n. {Leaving}.] [OE. leven, AS. l?fan, fr. l[=a]f remnant, heritage; akin to lifian, libban, to live, orig., to remain; cf. bel[=i]fan to remain, G. bleiben, Goth. bileiban. [root]119. See… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • leave — Ⅰ. leave [1] ► VERB (past and past part. left) 1) go away from. 2) cease living at, attending, or working for: he left home at 16. 3) allow or cause to remain; go away without taking. 4) (be left) remain to be used or dealt with: drink …   English terms dictionary

  • leave — leave1 [lēv] vt. left, leaving [ME leven < OE læfan, lit., to let remain (< * lafjan < base of laf, remnant, what remains), akin to (be)lifan, to remain, Ger bleiben, OHG belīban < IE * leip , to smear with grease, stick to < base… …   English World dictionary

  • leave — vt left, leav·ing: bequeath devise Merriam Webster’s Dictionary of Law. Merriam Webster. 1996. leave I …   Law dictionary

  • leave — [n1] permission allowance, assent, authorization, concession, consent, dispensation, freedom, go ahead*, green light*, liberty, okay, permit, sanction, sufferance, tolerance; concepts 376,685 Ant. limitation, prohibition, restriction leave [n2]… …   New thesaurus

  • Leave — Leave, n. [OE. leve, leave, AS. le[ a]f; akin to le[ o]f pleasing, dear, E. lief, D. oorlof leave, G. arlaub, and erlauben to permit, Icel. leyfi. [root]124. See {Lief}.] 1. Liberty granted by which restraint or illegality is removed; permission; …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • leave — leave, let Leave is well on its way to forcing out let in certain idiomatic uses, especially in leave / let be (Will you leave / let me be? I m trying to work), leave / let go (Please leave / let go of the handle), and above all in leave / let… …   Modern English usage

  • Leave — may be:* Permission for absence: ** Garden leave ** Leave (military) ** Leave, use of paid time off ** Parental leave*Leave (song), a song by American rock band R.E.M. included in their album New Adventures in Hi Fi. *Leave, a song by Lula and… …   Wikipedia

  • Leave — Leave, v. i. 1. To depart; to set out. [Colloq.] [1913 Webster] By the time I left for Scotland. Carlyle. [1913 Webster] 2. To cease; to desist; to leave off. He . . . began at the eldest, and left at the youngest. Gen. xliv. 12. [1913 Webster]… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • leave — leave; in·ter·leave; dis·leave; …   English syllables

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