candy striper

candy striper
noun Etymology: from the striped uniform worn suggesting the stripes on some sticks of candy Date: 1963 a teenage volunteer worker at a hospital

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • candy striper — ☆ candy striper n. [after the candy striped uniform commonly worn] a teenage girl who does volunteer work in a hospital …   English World dictionary

  • candy-striper — young female volunteer nurse at a hospital, by 1962, so called from the pink striped design of her uniform …   Etymology dictionary

  • candy striper — noun a volunteer worker in a hospital • Hypernyms: ↑volunteer, ↑unpaid worker * * * ˌstrīpə(r) noun Etymology: candy stripe + er (II); from the red and white stripes of her uniform …   Useful english dictionary

  • candy striper — noun a) A volunteer worker in a hospital or hospice. The entire convalescent home came to life as soon as the candy striper Cindy arrived. b) One who cheers others up with their youthful exuberance …   Wiktionary

  • candy-striper — canˈdy striper noun (N Am inf) A female volunteer hospital nurse (from the red and white striped uniform) • • • Main Entry: ↑candy …   Useful english dictionary

  • candy-striper — noun N. Amer. informal a female voluntary nurse in a hospital. Origin so named because of their candy striped uniforms …   English new terms dictionary

  • candy striper — Informal. a person, often a teenager, who works as a volunteer in a hospital. [1960 65; so called from the red and white striped uniform often worn] * * * …   Universalium

  • candy striper — can·dy strip·er kan dē .strī pər n a volunteer nurse s aide …   Medical dictionary

  • candy striper — noun (C) AmE a young person, usually a girl, who does unpaid work as a nurse s helper in a hospital in order to learn about hospital work …   Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • candy striper — can′dy strip er n. inf a volunteer worker at a hospital, esp. a teenager • Etymology: 1960–65; so called from the red and white striped uniform often worn …   From formal English to slang

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