I. verb (knew; known; knowing) Etymology: Middle English, from Old English cnāwan; akin to Old High German bichnāan to recognize, Latin gnoscere, noscere to come to know, Greek gignōskein Date: before 12th century transitive verb 1. a. (1) to perceive directly ; have direct cognition of (2) to have understanding of <
importance of knowing oneself
(3) to recognize the nature of ; discern b. (1) to recognize as being the same as something previously known (2) to be acquainted or familiar with (3) to have experience of 2. a. to be aware of the truth or factuality of ; be convinced or certain of b. to have a practical understanding of <
knows how to write
3. archaic to have sexual intercourse with intransitive verb 1. to have knowledge 2. to be or become cognizant — sometimes used interjectionally with you especially as a filler in informal speech • knowable adjectiveknower noun II. noun Date: 1592 knowledge

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.


Look at other dictionaries:

  • Know — (n[=o]), v. t. [imp. {Knew} (n[=u]); p. p. {Known} (n[=o]n); p. pr. & vb. n. {Knowing}.] [OE. knowen, knawen, AS. cn[ a]wan; akin to OHG. chn[ a]an (in comp.), Icel. kn[ a] to be able, Russ. znate to know, L. gnoscere, noscere, Gr. gighw skein,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • know — know; fore·know; fore·know·able; fore·know·er; fore·know·ing·ly; know·abil·i·ty; know·able; know·er; know·ing·ly; know·ing·ness; mis·know; pre·know; un·know·en; know·ing; un·know; know·able·ness; un·know·ably; un·know·ing·ness; …   English syllables

  • know — ► VERB (past knew; past part. known) 1) have knowledge of through observation, inquiry, or information. 2) be absolutely sure of something. 3) be familiar or friendly with. 4) have a good command of (a subject or language). 5) have personal… …   English terms dictionary

  • know — [nō] vt. knew, known, knowing [ME knowen < OE cnawan, akin to OHG cnāhan < IE base * ĝen , *ĝnō , to know, apprehend > CAN1, KEN, L gnoscere, to know, Gr gignōskein] 1. to have a clear perception or understanding of; be sure of or well… …   English World dictionary

  • Know — Know, v. i. 1. To have knowledge; to have a clear and certain perception; to possess wisdom, instruction, or information; often with of. [1913 Webster] Israel doth not know, my people doth not consider. Is. i. 3. [1913 Webster] If any man will do …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • know — The expression you know, inserted parenthetically in a sentence in speech, sometimes has real meaning, e.g. in introducing extra information that the hearer is likely to know already, but generally it is a meaningless sentence filler like I mean …   Modern English usage

  • Know — (n[=o]), n. Knee. [Obs.] Chaucer. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • know — I verb absorb, apperceive, appreciate, apprehend, assimilate, be apprised of, be informed, cognize, comprehend, conceive, conclude, conjecture, deduce, digest, discern, fathom, find, gather, glean, grasp, identify, infer, internalize, learn,… …   Law dictionary

  • know — [v1] understand information apperceive, appreciate, apprehend, be acquainted, be cognizant, be conversant in, be informed, be learned, be master of, be read, be schooled, be versed, cognize, comprehend, differentiate, discern, discriminate,… …   New thesaurus

  • know — know1 W1S1 [nəu US nou] v past tense knew [nju: US nu:] past participle known [nəun US noun] ▬▬▬▬▬▬▬ 1¦(have information)¦ 2¦(be sure)¦ 3¦(be familiar with somebody/something)¦ 4¦(realize)¦ 5¦(skill/experience)¦ 6¦(know somebody s qualities)¦ 7… …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • know — 1 verb past tense knew, past participle known INFORMATION 1 (intransitive, transitive not in progressive) to have information about something: Who knows the answer? | Do you happen to know the time? | When are they arriving? Maybe Mrs. Mott knows …   Longman dictionary of contemporary English

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