jowl
I. noun Etymology: alteration of Middle English choll Date: 15th century a cut of fish consisting of the head and usually adjacent parts II. noun Etymology: alteration of Middle English cholle, probably from Old English ceole throat — more at glutton Date: 1591 usually slack flesh (as a dewlap, wattle, or the pendulous part of a double chin) associated with the cheeks, lower jaw, or throat III. noun Etymology: alteration of Middle English chavel, from Old English ceafl; akin to Middle High German kivel jaw, Avestan zafar- mouth Date: 1598 1. a. jaw; especially mandible b. one of the lateral halves of the mandible 2. a. cheek 1 b. the cheek meat of a hog

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Jowl — (joul or j[=o]l), n. [For older chole, chaul, AS. ceaft jaw. Cf. {Chaps}.] The cheek; the jaw. [Written also {jole}, {choule}, {chowle}, and {geoule}.] [1913 Webster] {Cheek by jowl}, with the cheeks close together; side by side; in close… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • jowl — [ dʒaul ] noun count LITERARY the lower part of your cheek, especially if the skin hangs down and covers your jaw cheek by jowl if two or more things are cheek by jowl, they are very close to each other …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • Jowl — Jowl, v. t. To throw, dash, or knock. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] How the knave jowls it to the ground. Shak. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • jowl — [dʒaul] n [C usually plural] [: Old English; Origin: ceole] the skin that covers your lower jaw on either side of your face ▪ a man with heavy jowls (=jowls that hang down slightly) →cheek by jowl at ↑cheek1 (3) …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • jowl — jowl·er; jowl; …   English syllables

  • jowl — ► NOUN 1) the lower part of a cheek, especially when fleshy or drooping. 2) N. Amer. the cheek of a pig as meat. 3) the dewlap of cattle or wattle of birds. DERIVATIVES jowled adjective jowly adjective. ORIGIN Old English, related to …   English terms dictionary

  • jowl — jowl1 [joul; jōl] n. [ME chavel < OE ceafl, jaw, cheek, akin to ON kjoptr, MHG kivel < IE base * ĝebh , jaw, mouth > OIr gop, mouth, Czech ẑábra, gills (of fish)] 1. a jawbone or jaw; esp., the lower jaw with the chin and cheeks 2. the… …   English World dictionary

  • jowl — {{11}}jowl (n.1) jaw, 1570s, alteration of M.E. chawl (late 14c.), chavel (early 14c.), from O.E. ceafl, from P.Gmc. *kefalaz (Cf. M.H.G. kiver, Ger. kiefer, O.N. kjoptr jaw, Dan. kæft, Flem. kavel, Du. kevel gum …   Etymology dictionary

  • jowl — English has two words jowl, which are quite close together in meaning but are etymologically unrelated. The older, which means ‘jaw’, goes back ultimately to Old English ceafl. It is now encountered virtually only in the expression ‘cheek by… …   The Hutchinson dictionary of word origins

  • jowl — UK [dʒaʊl] / US noun [countable] Word forms jowl : singular jowl plural jowls literary the lower part of your cheek, especially if the skin hangs down and covers your jaw • cheek by jowl …   English dictionary

  • jowl — English has two words jowl, which are quite close together in meaning but are etymologically unrelated. The older, which means ‘jaw’, goes back ultimately to Old English ceafl. It is now encountered virtually only in the expression ‘cheek by… …   Word origins

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