indent
I. verb Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French endenter, from en- + dent tooth, from Latin dent-, dens — more at tooth Date: 14th century transitive verb 1. a. to divide (a document) so as to produce sections with irregular edges that can be matched for authentication b. to draw up (as a deed) in two or more exactly corresponding copies 2. to notch the edge of ; make jagged 3. indenture 4. to set (as a line of a paragraph) in from the margin 5. chiefly British to order by an indent intransitive verb 1. obsolete to make a formal or express agreement 2. to form an indentation 3. chiefly British to make out an indent for something • indenter noun II. noun Date: 15th century 1. a. indenture 1 b. a certificate issued by the United States at the close of the American Revolution for the principal or interest on the public debt 2. chiefly British a. an official requisition b. a purchase order for goods especially when sent from a foreign country 3. indention III. transitive verb Etymology: Middle English endenten, from en- + denten to dent Date: 15th century 1. to force inward so as to form a depression 2. to form a dent in • indenter noun IV. noun Date: 1596 indentation

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Indent — In*dent , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Indented}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Indenting}.] [OE. endenten to notch, fit in, OF. endenter, LL. indentare, fr. L. in + dens, dentis, tooth. See {Tooth}, and cf. {Indenture}.] [1913 Webster] 1. To notch; to jag; to cut… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Indent — has several meanings: * In computing, indent is a computer program that formats C programming language files with a particular indent style. See indent (Unix). * An indent can be an addition to a legal contract * Indent is a genus of moths whose… …   Wikipedia

  • Indent — Développeur Projet GNU Dernière version …   Wikipédia en Français

  • indent — Développeur Projet GNU Dernière version …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Indent — In*dent , v. i. 1. To be cut, notched, or dented. [1913 Webster] 2. To crook or turn; to wind in and out; to zigzag. [1913 Webster] 3. To contract; to bargain or covenant. Shak. [1913 Webster] To indent and drive bargains with the Almighty. South …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • indent — indent1 [in dent′; ] for n. [ in′dent΄, in dent′] vt. [ME endenten < OFr endenter or ML indentare, both < L in, in + dens, TOOTH] 1. a) to cut toothlike points into (an edge or border); notch; also, to join by mating notches b) to make… …   English World dictionary

  • Indent — In*dent , n. 1. A cut or notch in the margin of anything, or a recess like a notch. Shak. [1913 Webster] 2. A stamp; an impression. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] 3. A certificate, or intended certificate, issued by the government of the United States at… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Indént — (engl., »Einschnitt, Kerbe«, Indentgeschäft), Bezeichnung für ein im Verkehr mit Ostasien und Australien übliches Handelsgeschäft, wobei eine europäische Handelsfirma oder die Zweigniederlassung einer solchen einem eingebornen Händler europäische …   Meyers Großes Konversations-Lexikon

  • Indent — (engl.), Indentgeschäft, Vertrag über Warenlieferung an europ. Handelshäuser in Ostindien, oder der letztern an einheimische Händler …   Kleines Konversations-Lexikon

  • indent — index bind (obligate), depress, requisition, undertake Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …   Law dictionary

  • Indent —   [engl.], Absatzeinzug …   Universal-Lexikon

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