imperative
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English imperatyf, from Late Latin imperativus, from Latin imperatus, past participle of imperare to command — more at emperor Date: 15th century 1. a. of, relating to, or constituting the grammatical mood that expresses the will to influence the behavior of another b. expressive of a command, entreaty, or exhortation c. having power to restrain, control, and direct 2. not to be avoided or evaded ; necessary <
an imperative duty
>
Synonyms: see masterfulimperatively adverbimperativeness noun II. noun Date: 1530 1. the imperative mood or a verb form or verbal phrase expressing it 2. something that is imperative: as a. command, order b. rule, guide c. an obligatory act or duty d. an imperative judgment or proposition

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Imperative — Im*per a*tive, a. [L. imperativus, fr. imperare to command; pref. im in + parare to make ready, prepare: cf. F. imp[ e]ratif. See {Perade}, and cf. {Empire}.] 1. Expressive of command; containing positive command; authoritatively or absolutely… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Imperative — can mean: *Imperative mood, a grammatical mood expressing commands, direct requests, and prohibitions *Imperative programming, a programming paradigm in computer science *Moral imperative, a philosophical concept relating to obligation …   Wikipedia

  • imperative — I adjective compulsory, critical, crucial, demanding, essential, exigent, impero, indispensable, mandatory, necessary, needful, obligatory, pressing, required, requiring immediate attention, requisite, unavoidable, urgent associated concepts:… …   Law dictionary

  • imperative — [im per′ə tiv] adj. [LL imperativus, commanding < pp. of L imperare, to command: see EMPEROR] 1. having the nature of, or indicating, power or authority; commanding [an imperative gesture] 2. absolutely necessary; urgent; compelling [it is… …   English World dictionary

  • Imperative — Im*per a*tive, n. (Gram.) The imperative mood; also, a verb in the imperative mood. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • imperative — [adj1] necessary acute, burning, clamant, clamorous, compulsory, critical, crucial, crying, essential, exigent, immediate, important, importunate, indispensable, inescapable, insistent, instant, no turning back*, obligatory, pressing, urgent,… …   New thesaurus

  • imperative — 1 peremptory, imperious, *masterful, domineering Analogous words: commanding, ordering, bidding (see COMMAND vb): magisterial, *dictatorial, dogmatic, oracular: arbitrary, autocratic, despotic (see ABSOLUTE) Contrasted words: supplicating or… …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • imperative — ► ADJECTIVE 1) of vital importance. 2) giving an authoritative command. 3) Grammar denoting the mood of a verb that expresses a command or exhortation, as in come here! ► NOUN ▪ an essential or urgent thing. DERIVATIVES imperatively adverb …   English terms dictionary

  • imperative — I adj. 1) imperative to + inf. (it is imperative to act now) 2) imperative that + clause; subj. (it is imperative that you be/should be present) II n. 1) a moral imperative 2) an imperative that + clause; subj. (it is a moral imperative that no… …   Combinatory dictionary

  • imperative — I UK [ɪmˈperətɪv] / US adjective 1) formal extremely important and urgent Long term investing is risky, and careful planning is imperative. it is imperative (that): It is imperative that these claims are dealt with quickly. it is imperative to do …   English dictionary

  • imperative — im|per|a|tive1 [ ım perətıv ] adjective 1. ) FORMAL extremely important and urgent: Long term investing is risky, and careful planning is imperative. it is imperative (that): It is imperative that these claims are dealt with quickly. it is… …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”