humph
I. interjection Etymology: imitative of a grunt Date: 1803 — used to express doubt or contempt II. verb Date: 1814 intransitive verb to utter a humph transitive verb to utter (as a remark) in a tone suggestive of a humph

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Humph — Humph, interj. [Of imitative origin.] An exclamation denoting surprise, or contempt, doubt, etc. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • humph — [hʌmf, hmh, hm] interjection [Date: 1500 1600; Origin: A natural sound] used to show that you do not believe something or do not approve of something …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • humph — [ hʌmf ] interjection used for showing that you are annoyed or do not approve of something …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • humph — as a grunting sound of disdain, etc., from 1815 …   Etymology dictionary

  • humph — [humf: ] conventionalized pronun. interj., n. (a snorting or grunting sound) used to express doubt, disdain, disgust, etc …   English World dictionary

  • humph — an inarticulate expression resembling a snort; spelling pron. /humf/, interj. 1. (used to indicate disbelief, contempt, etc.) v.i., v.t. 2. to utter by or as if by expressing humph. [1675 85] * * * …   Universalium

  • humph — interjection Used to express doubt or disapproval Syn: humbug …   Wiktionary

  • humph — Scottish Vernacular Dictionary Convex shape below ones shoulders …   English dialects glossary

  • humph — mm ,hÊŒmf interj. nonsense! …   English contemporary dictionary

  • humph — exclamation used to express dissatisfaction or doubt …   English new terms dictionary

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