I. noun (plural horses; also horse) Etymology: Middle English hors, from Old English; akin to Old High German hros horse Date: before 12th century 1. a. (1) a large solid-hoofed herbivorous ungulate mammal (Equus caballus, family Equidae, the horse family) domesticated since prehistoric times and used as a beast of burden, a draft animal, or for riding (2) racehorse <
play the horses
b. a male horse; especially stallion c. a recent or extinct animal (as a zebra, ass, or onager) of the horse family 2. a. jackstay b. a frame usually with legs used for supporting something (as planks or staging) c. (1) pommel horse (2) vaulting horse 3. horse plural cavalry 4. a mass of the same geological character as the wall rock occurring within a vein 5. horsepower 6. slang heroin 7. an athlete whose performance is consistently strong and reliable <
a team with the horses to win the pennant
8. or H-O-R-S-E a game in which players take turns attempting to duplicate successful basketball shots, a letter of the word "horse" is awarded for each missed attempt, and the first player to receive all five letters loses • horseless adjectivehorselike adjective II. verb (horsed; horsing) Date: before 12th century transitive verb 1. to provide with a horse 2. to move by brute force intransitive verb of a mare to be in heat III. adjective Date: 15th century 1. a. of or relating to a horse b. hauled or powered by a horse <
a horse barge
2. large or coarse of its kind 3. mounted on horses <
horse guards

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.


Look at other dictionaries:

  • Horse — (h[^o]rs), n. [AS. hors; akin to OS. hros, D. & OHG. ros, G. ross, Icel. hross; and perh. to L. currere to run, E. course, current Cf. {Walrus}.] 1. (Zo[ o]l.) A hoofed quadruped of the genus {Equus}; especially, the domestic horse ({Equus… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • horse — [hôrs] n. pl. horses or horse [ME hors < OE hors, hros, akin to Ger ross (OHG hros), prob. < IE base * (s)ker , to leap (or < ? * k̑ers , to run > L cursus)] 1. a domesticated or wild, perissodactylous mammal (Equus caballus), raised… …   English World dictionary

  • HORSE — (Heb. סוּס). The present day horse is descended from the wild species which formerly roamed the steppes of Asia   and Africa in herds and of which only one species survives today in Central Asia. The horse was introduced into the Near East from… …   Encyclopedia of Judaism

  • Horse — steht für: H.O.R.S.E., Poker Spielart Horse (Ballspiel), Basketballvariante Horse (Film), Experimentalfilm von Andy Warhol (1965) Siehe auch: Black Horse Crazy Horse Dark Horse Horse Cave Horse Island Paint Horse Shire Horse …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • horse — ► NOUN 1) a large four legged mammal with a flowing mane and tail, used for riding and for pulling heavy loads. 2) an adult male horse, as opposed to a mare or colt. 3) (treated as sing. or pl. ) cavalry. 4) a frame or structure on which… …   English terms dictionary

  • Horse — (h[^o]rs), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Horsed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Horsing}.] [AS. horsion.] 1. To provide with a horse, or with horses; to mount on, or as on, a horse. Being better horsed, outrode me. Shak. [1913 Webster] 2. To sit astride of; to… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Horse — [hɔ:s ], das; [engl. horse, eigtl. = Pferd, Tabuwort] (Jargon): Heroin. * * * Horse [hɔ:s], das; [engl. horse, eigtl. = Pferd, Tabuwort] (Jargon): Heroin …   Universal-Lexikon

  • Horse — Horse, v. i. To get on horseback. [Obs.] Shelton. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • horse — hȯ(ə)rs n, pl hors·es also horse a large solid hoofed herbivorous mammal of the genus Equus (E. caballus) domesticated since prehistoric times …   Medical dictionary

  • Horse — [hɔ:s] das; <aus gleichbed. engl. amerik. horse, eigtl. »Pferd«> (Jargon) Heroin …   Das große Fremdwörterbuch

  • Horse — 〈[hɔ:s] n.; Gen.: ; Pl.: unz.; umg.〉 Heroin [Etym.: engl., eigtl. »Pferd« (verhüllend)] …   Lexikalische Deutsches Wörterbuch

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