hold
I. verb (held; holding) Etymology: Middle English, from Old English healdan; akin to Old High German haltan to hold, and perhaps to Latin celer rapid, Greek klonos agitation Date: before 12th century transitive verb 1. a. to have possession or ownership of or have at one's disposal <
holds property worth millions
>
<
the bank holds the title to the car
>
b. to have as a privilege or position of responsibility <
hold a professorship
>
c. to have as a mark of distinction <
holds the record for the 100-yard dash
>
<
holds a PhD
>
2. to keep under restraint <
hold price increases to a minimum
>
: as a. to prevent free expression of <
hold your temper
>
b. to prevent from some action <
ordered the troops to hold fire
>
<
the only restraining motive which may hold the hand of a tyrant — Thomas Jefferson
>
c. to keep back from use <
ask them to hold a room for us
>
<
I'll have a hot dog, and hold the mustard
>
d. to delay temporarily the handling of <
please hold all my calls
>
3. to make liable or accountable or bound to an obligation <
I'll hold you to your promise
>
4. a. to have or maintain in the grasp <
hold my hand
>
<
this is how you hold the racket
>
; also aim, point <
held a gun on them
>
b. to support in a particular position or keep from falling or moving <
hold me up so I can see
>
<
hold the ladder steady
>
<
a clamp holds the whole thing together
>
<
hold your head up
>
c. to bear the pressure of ; support <
can the roof hold all of that weight
>
5. to prevent from leaving or getting away <
hold the train
>
: as a. to avoid emitting or letting out <
how long can you hold your breath
>
b. to restrain as or as if a captive <
the suspect was held without bail
>
<
held them at gunpoint
>
; also to have strong appeal to <
the book held my interest throughout
>
6. a. to enclose and keep in a container or within bounds ; contain <
the jug holds one gallon
>
<
this corral will not hold all of the horses
>
b. to be able to consume easily or without undue effect <
can't hold any more pie
>
; especially to be able to drink (alcoholic beverages) without becoming noticeably drunk <
can't hold your liquor
>
c. accommodate <
the restaurant holds 400 diners
>
d. to have as a principal or essential feature or attribute <
the book holds a number of surprises
>
; also to have in store <
no one knows what the future holds
>
7. a. to have in the mind or express as a judgment, opinion, or belief <
I hold the view that this is wrong
>
<
hold a grudge
>
<
holding that it is nobody's business but his — Jack Olsen
>
— often used with against <
in America they hold everything you say against you — Paul McCartney
>
b. to think of in a particular way ; regard <
were held in high esteem
>
8. a. to assemble for and carry on the activity of <
held a convention
>
b. to cause to be carried on ; conduct <
will hold a seminar
>
c. to produce or sponsor especially as a public exhibition <
will hold an art show
>
9. a. to maintain occupation, control, or defense of <
the troops held the ridge
>
; also to resist the offensive efforts or advance of <
held the opposing team to just two points
>
b. to maintain (a certain condition, situation, or course of action) without change <
hold a course due east
>
10. to cover (a part of the body) especially for protection <
had to hold their ears because of the cold
>
intransitive verb 1. a. to maintain position ; refuse to give ground <
the defensive line is holding
>
b. to continue in the same way or to the same degree ; last <
hopes the weather will hold
>
— often used with up 2. to derive right or title — often used with of or from 3. to be or remain valid ; apply <
the rule holds in most cases
>
— often used in the phrase hold true 4. to maintain a grasp on something ; remain fastened to something <
the anchor held in the rough sea
>
5. to go ahead as one has been going <
held south for several miles
>
6. to bear or carry oneself <
asked him to hold still
>
7. to forbear an intended or threatened action ; halt, pause — often used as a command 8. to stop counting during a countdown 9. slang to have illicit drug material in one's possession Synonyms: see contain II. noun Date: 14th century 1. stronghold 1 2. a. confinement, custody b. prison 3. a. (1) the act or the manner of holding or grasping ; grip <
released his hold on the handle
>
(2) a manner of grasping an opponent in wrestling b. a nonphysical bond that attaches, restrains, or constrains or by which something is affected, controlled, or dominated <
has lost its hold on the broad public — Oscar Cargill
>
c. full comprehension <
get hold of exactly what is happening — J. P. Lyford
>
d. full or immediate control ; possession <
get hold of yourself
>
<
wants to get hold of a road map
>
e. touch 14 — used with of <
tried to get hold of me
>
4. something that may be grasped as a support 5. a. fermata b. the time between the onset and the release of a vocal articulation 6. a sudden motionless posture at the end of a dance 7. a. an order or indication that something is to be reserved or delayed b. a delay in a countdown (as in launching a spacecraft) III. noun Etymology: alteration of hole Date: 1591 1. the interior of a ship below decks; especially the cargo deck of a ship 2. the cargo compartment of a plane

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Hold — Hold, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Held}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Holding}. {Holden}, p. p., is obs. in elegant writing, though still used in legal language.] [OE. haldan, D. houden, OHG. hoten, Icel. halda, Dan. holde, Sw. h[*a]lla, Goth. haldan to feed, tend… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • hold — hold1 [hōld] vt. held, holding [ME holden < Anglian OE haldan (WS healdan), akin to Ger halten, Goth haldan, to tend sheep < IE base * kel , to drive, incite to action > Gr kelēs, swift horse, L celer, swift: prob. sense development:… …   English World dictionary

  • hold — Ⅰ. hold [1] ► VERB (past and past part. held) 1) grasp, carry, or support. 2) keep or detain. 3) have in one s possession. 4) contain or be capable of containing. 5) have or occupy (a job or position) …   English terms dictionary

  • Hold — Hold, v. i. In general, to keep one s self in a given position or condition; to remain fixed. Hence: [1913 Webster] 1. Not to move; to halt; to stop; mostly in the imperative. [1913 Webster] And damned be him that first cries, Hold, enough! Shak …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • hold — vb 1 hold back, withhold, reserve, detain, retain, *keep, keep back, keep out Analogous words: *restrain, inhibit, curb, check: preserve, conserve, *save Contrasted words: *relinquish, surrender, abandon, resign, yield 2 …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • Hold — (h[=o]ld), n. 1. The act of holding, as in or with the hands or arms; the manner of holding, whether firm or loose; seizure; grasp; clasp; grip; possession; often used with the verbs take and lay. [1913 Webster] Ne have I not twelve pence within… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • hold — vt held, hold·ing 1 a: to have lawful possession or ownership of held the property as tenants in common the band hold s the title to the car b: to have as a privilege or position of responsibility hold ing …   Law dictionary

  • Hold — may refer to: * Hold, to delay temporarily the handling of * Hold (ship), interior cargo space * Hold (aviation), a place for an aircraft to loop around near its destination * Hold (baseball), a statistic that may be awarded to a relief pitcher * …   Wikipedia

  • hold — [n] grasp, possession authority, clasp, clench, clinch, clout, clutch, control, dominance, dominion, grip, influence, occupancy, occupation, ownership, pull, purchase, retention, sway, tenacity, tenure; concepts 190,343,710 Ant. dispossession,… …   New thesaurus

  • Hold — ist der Familienname folgender Personen: Alexander Hold (* 1962), deutscher Richter und Fernsehschauspieler Carl Hold (1871–1946), deutscher Politiker und Industrieller Hans Hold (1826 1910), Schweizer Politiker (FDP Liberale) und Militär… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Hold — Hold, er, este, adj. et adv. 1) Geneigt, des andern Glück gern zu sehen, Liebe gegen denselben empfindend, ohne Unterschied des Standes; nur in Gestalt eines Nebenwortes. Der Herr wird den Demüthigen hold seyn, Sir. 3, 20. Mosen waren beyde Gott… …   Grammatisch-kritisches Wörterbuch der Hochdeutschen Mundart

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