I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English hægl; akin to Old High German hagal hail Date: before 12th century 1. precipitation in the form of small balls or lumps usually consisting of concentric layers of clear ice and compact snow 2. something that gives the effect of a shower of hail <
a hail of rifle fire
II. intransitive verb Date: before 12th century 1. to precipitate hail <
it was hailing hard
2. to pour down or strike like hail III. interjection Etymology: Middle English, from Old Norse heill, from heill healthy — more at whole Date: 13th century 1. archaic — used as a salutation 2. — used to express acclamation <
hail to the chief — Sir Walter Scott
IV. verb Date: 13th century transitive verb 1. a. salute, greet b. to greet with enthusiastic approval ; acclaim 2. to greet or summon by calling <
hail a taxi
intransitive verb to call out; especially to call a greeting to a passing ship • hailer noun V. noun Date: 1500 1. an exclamation of greeting or acclamation 2. a calling to attract attention 3. hearing distance <
stayed within hail

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.


Look at other dictionaries:

  • Hail — is a form of precipitation which consists of balls or irregular lumps of ice (hailstones). Hailstones usually consist mostly of water ice and measure between 5 and 150 millimeters in diameter, with the larger stones coming from severe… …   Wikipedia

  • hail — hail1 [hāl] vt. [ME hailen, to salute, greet < hail, heil < ON heill, whole, sound, akin to OE hal (see HALE1, WHOLE): used as a salutation] 1. to welcome, greet, etc. with or as with cheers; acclaim 2. to name by way of tribute; salute as… …   English World dictionary

  • hail — Ⅰ. hail [1] ► NOUN 1) pellets of frozen rain falling in showers from cumulonimbus clouds. 2) a large number of things hurled forcefully through the air. ► VERB (it hails, it is hailing, etc.) ▪ hail falls …   English terms dictionary

  • Hail — Hail, interj. [See {Hail}, v. t.] An exclamation of respectful or reverent salutation, or, occasionally, of familiar greeting. Hail, brave friend. Shak. [1913 Webster] {All hail}. See in the Vocabulary. {Hail Mary}, a form of prayer made use of… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Hail — حائل …   Wikipedia Español

  • Hail — (h[=a]l), n. [OE. hail, ha[yogh]el, AS. h[ae]gel, hagol; akin to D., G., Dan., & Sw. hagel; Icel. hagl; cf. Gr. ka chlhx pebble.] Small roundish masses of ice precipitated from the clouds, where they are formed by the congelation of vapor. The… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • hail — [n] torrent barrage, bombardment, broadside, cannonade, hailstorm, pelting, rain, salvo, shower, storm, volley; concepts 189,524 hail [v1] call to, yell for accost, address, flag, flag down*, greet, hello, holler*, salute, shoulder, shout, signal …   New thesaurus

  • Hail — Hail, n. A wish of health; a salutation; a loud call. Their puissant hail. M. Arnold. [1913 Webster] The angel hail bestowed. Milton. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • HAIL! — Жанры хэви метал трэш метал NWOBHM Годы c 2008 Страна …   Википедия

  • Hail — Hail, v. t. To pour forcibly down, as hail. Shak. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Hail — Hail, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Hailed} (h[=a]ld); p. pr. & vb. n. {Hailing}.] [OE. hailen, AS. hagalian.] To pour down particles of ice, or frozen vapors. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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