gutter
I. noun Etymology: Middle English goter, from Anglo-French gutere, goter, from gute drop, from Latin gutta Date: 14th century 1. a. a trough along the eaves to catch and carry off rainwater b. a low area (as at the edge of a street) to carry off surface water (as to a sewer) c. a trough or groove to catch and direct something <
the gutters of a bowling alley
>
2. a white space formed by the adjoining inside margins of two facing pages (as of a book) 3. the lowest or most vulgar level or condition of human life II. verb Date: 14th century transitive verb 1. to cut or wear gutters in 2. to provide with a gutter intransitive verb 1. a. to flow in rivulets b. of a candle to melt away through a channel out of the side of the cup hollowed out by the burning wick 2. to incline downward in a draft <
the candle flame guttering
>
III. adjective Date: 15th century of, relating to, or characteristic of the gutter; especially marked by extreme vulgarity, cheapness, or indecency <
gutter politics
>

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Gutter — may refer to:* Rain gutter, a narrow channel which collects rainwater from the roof of a building and diverts it away from the structure, typically into a drain. * Street gutter, a depression which runs alongside a city street, usually at the… …   Wikipedia

  • Gutter — Gut ter, n. [OE. gotere, OF. goutiere, F. goutti[ e]re, fr. OF. gote, goute, drop, F. goutte, fr. L. gutta.] [1913 Webster] 1. A channel at the eaves of a roof for conveying away the rain; an eaves channel; an eaves trough. [1913 Webster] 2. A… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Gutter — (englisch = Rinnstein) bezeichnet: Gutter (Comic), den Raum zwischen den Panels eines Comics Gutter, die Bereiche rechts und links neben der Lauffläche einer Bowlingbahn, siehe Bowling #Die Bowlingbahn Gutter Ballet, ein 1989 erschienenes… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Gutter — Gut*ter, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Guttered}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Guttering}.] 1. To cut or form into small longitudinal hollows; to channel. Shak. [1913 Webster] 2. To supply with a gutter or gutters. [R.] Dryden. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • gutter — ► NOUN 1) a shallow trough beneath the edge of a roof, or a channel at the side of a street, for carrying off rainwater. 2) (the gutter) a very poor or squalid environment. 3) technical a groove or channel for flowing liquid. ► VERB 1) (of a… …   English terms dictionary

  • gutter — [gut′ər] n. [ME gotere < OFr gutiere < L gutta, a drop] 1. a trough or channel along or under the eaves of a roof, to carry off rain water 2. a narrow channel along the side of a road or street, to carry off water, as to a sewer 3. a place… …   English World dictionary

  • Gutter — Gut ter, v. i. To become channeled, as a candle when the flame flares in the wind. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Gutter — Gutter,   Bundsteg …   Universal-Lexikon

  • gutter — [n] ditch channel, conduit, culvert, dike, drain, duct, eaves, fosse, funnel, gully, moat, pipe, runnel, sewer, sluice, spout, sulcation, trench, trough, tube, watercourse; concept 440 …   New thesaurus

  • gutter — [[t]gʌ̱tə(r)[/t]] gutters, guttering, guttered 1) N COUNT: usu the N The gutter is the edge of a road next to the pavement, where rain water collects and flows away. It is supposed to be washed down the gutter and into the city s vast sewerage… …   English dictionary

  • gutter — I UK [ˈɡʌtə(r)] / US [ˈɡʌtər] noun Word forms gutter : singular gutter plural gutters 1) [countable] the edge of the road, where water flows away 2) [countable] guttering 3) a) the gutter the lowest level of moral standards He was accused of… …   English dictionary

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