I. adjective Etymology: New Latin Fucus, from Latin Date: 1839 relating to or resembling the rockweeds II. noun Date: circa 1841 a fucoid seaweed or fossil

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

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  • Fucoid — Fu coid, a. [Fucus + oid.] (Bot.) (a) Properly, belonging to an order of alga: ({Fucoide[ae]}) which are blackish in color, and produce o[ o]spores which are not fertilized until they have escaped from the conceptacle. The common rockweeds and… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Fucoid — Fu coid, n. (Bot.) A plant, whether recent or fossil, which resembles a seaweed. See {Fucoid}, a. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • fucoid — [fyo͞o′koid΄] adj. [< FUCUS + OID] of or like seaweed, esp. rockweed n. a seaweed; esp., rockweed …   English World dictionary

  • fucoid — 1. adjective a) Resembling or relating to seaweeds of the genus Fucus. The first cell division in zygotes of the fucoid brown alga Pelvetia compressa is asymmetric ... b) Of sandstone: containing seaweed like markings. The Fucoid beds are quite… …   Wiktionary

  • fucoid — /fyooh koyd/, adj. 1. resembling or related to seaweeds of the genus Fucus. n. 2. a fucoid seaweed. [1830 40; FUC(US) + OID] * * * …   Universalium

  • fucoid — fu•coid [[t]ˈfyu kɔɪd[/t]] adj. 1) mcr resembling or related to seaweeds of the genus Fucus[/ex] 2) mcr a fucoid seaweed • Etymology: 1830–40 …   From formal English to slang

  • fucoid — /ˈfjukɔɪd/ (say fyoohkoyd) adjective 1. resembling, or allied to, seaweeds of the genus Fucus. See fucus. –noun 2. a fucoid seaweed. {fuc(us) + oid} …   Australian English dictionary

  • fucoid — noun 1. a fossilized cast or impression of algae of the order Fucales • Hypernyms: ↑fossil • Member Holonyms: ↑Fucales, ↑order Fucales 2. any of various algae of the family Fucaceae • Syn: ↑fucoid algae …   Useful english dictionary

  • fucoid — shaped like seaweed Shapes and Resemblance …   Phrontistery dictionary

  • fucoid — fu·coid …   English syllables

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