fold
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English falod; akin to Old Saxon faled enclosure Date: before 12th century 1. an enclosure for sheep 2. a. a flock of sheep b. a group of people or institutions that share a common faith, belief, activity, or enthusiasm II. transitive verb Date: before 12th century to pen up or confine (as sheep) in a fold III. verb Etymology: Middle English, from Old English fealdan; akin to Old High German faldan to fold, Greek diplasios twofold Date: before 12th century transitive verb 1. to lay one part over another part of <
fold a letter
>
2. to reduce the length or bulk of by doubling over <
fold a tent
>
3. to clasp together ; entwine <
fold the hands
>
4. to clasp or enwrap closely ; embrace 5. to bend (as a layer of rock) into folds 6. a. to incorporate (a food ingredient) into a mixture by repeated gentle overturnings without stirring or beating b. to incorporate closely 7. a. to concede defeat by withdrawing (one's cards) from play (as in poker) b. to bring to an end intransitive verb 1. to become doubled or pleated 2. to fail completely ; collapse; especially to go out of business 3. to fold one's cards (as in poker) • foldable adjective IV. noun Date: 13th century 1. a part doubled or laid over another part ; pleat 2. something that is folded together or that enfolds 3. a. a bend or flexure produced in rock by forces operative after the depositing or consolidation of the rock b. chiefly British an undulation in the landscape 4. a margin apparently formed by the doubling upon itself of a flat anatomical structure (as a membrane) 5. a crease made by folding something (as a newspaper)

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • fold — fold·able; fold·age; fold; fold·less; in·fold; man·i·fold·er; man·i·fold·ly; man·i·fold·ness; mil·lion·fold; mul·ti·fold; one·fold; re·fold; re·fold·er; scaf·fold·age; scaf·fold·er; scaf·fold·ing; sev·en·fold·ed; tri·fold; twi·fold;… …   English syllables

  • Fold — Fold, n. [OE. fald, fold, AS. fald, falod.] 1. An inclosure for sheep; a sheep pen. [1913 Webster] Leaps o er the fence with ease into the fold. Milton. [1913 Webster] 2. A flock of sheep; figuratively, the Church or a church; as, Christ s fold.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Fold — (f[=o]ld), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Folded}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Folding}.] [OE. folden, falden, AS. fealdan; akin to OHG. faltan, faldan, G. falten, Icel. falda, Dan. folde, Sw. f[*a]lla, Goth. fal[thorn]an, cf. Gr. di pla sios twofold, Skr. pu[.t]a a… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • fold — fold1 [fōld] vt. [ME folden < OE faldan (WS fealdan), akin to Ger falten < IE * pel to < base * pel , to fold > (SIM)PLE, (TRI)PLE] 1. a) to bend or press (something) so that one part is over another; double up on itself [to fold a… …   English World dictionary

  • Fold — Fold, n. [From {Fold}, v. In sense 2 AS. feald, akin to fealdan to fold.] 1. A doubling,esp. of any flexible substance; a part laid over on another part; a plait; a plication. [1913 Webster] Mummies . . . shrouded in a number of folds of linen.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • fold — Ⅰ. fold [1] ► VERB 1) bend (something) over on itself so that one part of it covers another. 2) (often as adj. folding) be able to be folded into a flatter shape. 3) use (a soft or flexible material) to cover or wrap something in. 4)… …   English terms dictionary

  • fold — [fəʊld ǁ foʊld] also fold up verb [intransitive] ECONOMICS if a business folds or folds up, it stops operating or trading because it does not have enough money to continue: • The U.K. engineering firm has folded today with the loss of 30 jobs. •… …   Financial and business terms

  • Fold — Fold, v. i. To confine sheep in a fold. [R.] [1913 Webster] The star that bids the shepherd fold. Milton. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • -fold — [fəʊld ǁ foʊld] suffix a particular number of times: • The value of the house has increased fourfold in the last ten years (= it is now worth four times as much as it was ten years ago ) . * * * fold suffix ► having the stat …   Financial and business terms

  • fold — [n] double thickness bend, circumvolution, cockle, convolution, corrugation, crease, crimp, crinkle, dog’s ear*, flection, flexure, furrow, gather, gathering, groove, knife edge*, lap, lapel, layer, loop, overlap, plait, pleat, plica, plication,… …   New thesaurus

  • Fold — Fold, v. i. To become folded, plaited, or doubled; to close over another of the same kind; to double together; as, the leaves of the door fold. 1 Kings vi. 34. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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