flatter
I. verb Etymology: Middle English flateren, from Anglo-French flater to lap, flatter, of Germanic origin; akin to Old High German flaz flat Date: 13th century transitive verb 1. to praise excessively especially from motives of self-interest 2. a. archaic beguile 4 b. to encourage or gratify especially with the assurance that something is right <
I flatter myself that my interpretation is correct
>
3. a. to portray too favorably <
the portrait flatters him
>
b. to display to advantage <
candlelight often flatters the face
>
intransitive verb to use flattery • flatterer nounflatteringly adverb II. noun Date: 1714 one that flattens; especially a flat-faced swage used in smithing

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • flatter — [ flate ] v. tr. <conjug. : 1> • XIIe; aussi flater, flatir « jeter à plat »; du frq. °flat « plat » I ♦ A ♦ (Sujet personne; compl. être animé) 1 ♦ Louer excessivement ou faussement (qqn), pour plaire, séduire. ⇒ aduler, encenser,… …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • Flatter — Flat ter (fl[a^]t t[ e]r), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Flattered}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Flattering}.] [OE. flateren, cf. OD. flatteren; akin to G. flattern to flutter, Icel. fla[eth]ra to fawn, flatter: cf. F. flatter. Cf. {Flitter}, {Flutter}, {Flattery}.] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Flatter — Flat ter, v. i. To use flattery or insincere praise. [1913 Webster] If it may stand him more in stead to lie, Say and unsay, feign, flatter, or adjure. Milton. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • flatter — (v.) early 13c., from O.Fr. flater to flatter (13c.), originally stroke with the hand, caress, from Frankish *flat palm, flat of the hand (see FLAT (Cf. flat) (adj.)). [O]ne of many onomatopoeic verbs beginning with fl and denoting unsteady or… …   Etymology dictionary

  • flatter — [v1] compliment excessively adulate, beslaver, blandish, bootlick*, brownnose*, build up*, butter up*, cajole, cater to, charm, con, court, fawn*, get next to*, glorify, grovel, humor, inveigle, jolly, lay it on thick*, massage, oil*, overpraise …   New thesaurus

  • flatter — ► VERB 1) praise or compliment insincerely, especially to further one s own interests. 2) (usu. be flattered) cause to feel honoured and pleased. 3) (flatter oneself) believe something favourable about oneself, especially something unfounded. 4)… …   English terms dictionary

  • flatter — flatter1 [flat′ər] vt. [ME flateren < OFr flater, to smooth, caress with flat hand < Frank * flat, akin to OHG flaz, FLAT1] 1. to praise too much, untruly, or insincerely, as in order to win favor 2. to try to please, or ingratiate oneself… …   English World dictionary

  • Flatter — Flat ter (fl[a^]t t[ e]r), n. 1. One who, or that which, makes flat or flattens. [1913 Webster] 2. (Metal Working) (a) A flat faced fulling hammer. (b) A drawplate with a narrow, rectangular orifice, for drawing flat strips, as watch springs, etc …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • flatter — index overestimate Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …   Law dictionary

  • Flatter — Flatter,die:dieF.machen:⇨wegschleichen(I) …   Das Wörterbuch der Synonyme

  • flatter — (fla té) v. a. 1°   Caresser par quelque attouchement (sens étymologique et primitif). Flatter un enfant. Flatter un cheval avec la main. Le chien flatte avec la queue. •   Puis, me flattant l épaule, il me fit librement L honneur que d approuver …   Dictionnaire de la Langue Française d'Émile Littré

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