feat
I. noun Etymology: Middle English fait, fet, from Anglo-French, from Latin factum, from neuter of factus, past participle of facere to make, do — more at do Date: 14th century 1. act, deed 2. a. a deed notable especially for courage b. an act or product of skill, endurance, or ingenuity Synonyms: feat, exploit, achievement mean a remarkable deed. feat implies strength or dexterity or daring <
an acrobatic feat
>
. exploit suggests an adventurous or heroic act <
his exploits as a spy
>
. achievement implies hard-won success in the face of difficulty or opposition <
her achievements as a chemist
>
. II. adjective Etymology: Middle English fete, fayt, from Anglo-French fait, past participle of faire Date: 15th century 1. archaic becoming, neat 2. archaic smart, dexterous

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • feat — [fi:t] n [Date: 1300 1400; : Old French; Origin: fait thing done , from Latin factum; FACT] something that is an impressive achievement, because it needs a lot of skill, strength etc to do remarkable/considerable/incredible etc feat ▪ They… …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • Feat — Feat, a. [Compar. {Feater}; superl. {Featest}.] [F. fait made, shaped, fit, p. p. of faire to make or do. See {Feat}, n.] Dexterous in movements or service; skillful; neat; nice; pretty. [Archaic] [1913 Webster] Never master had a page . . . so… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • feat — [ fit ] noun count something impressive that someone does: feats of strength/endurance/skill be no mean feat (=not be easy to achieve): We ve remained profitable for 27 years, and that s no mean feat …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • feat — n Feat, exploit, achievement denote a remarkable deed or performance. Feat applies particularly to an act involving physical strength, dexterity, and often courage; an exploit is an adventurous, heroic, or brilliant deed; achievement emphasizes… …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • Feat — (f[=e]t), n. [OE. fet, OF. fet, fait, F. fait, factum, fr. L. facere, factum, to make or do. Cf. {Fact}, {Feasible}, {Do}.] 1. An act; a deed; an exploit. [1913 Webster] The warlike feats I have done. Shak. [1913 Webster] 2. A striking act of… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Feat — Feat, v. t. To form; to fashion. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] To the more mature, A glass that feated them. Shak. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • feat — mid 14c., action, deeds, from Anglo Fr. fet, from O.Fr. fait (12c.) action, deed, achievement, from L. factum thing done, a noun based on the pp. of facere make, do (see FACTITIOUS (Cf. factitious)). Sense of exceptional or noble deed arose… …   Etymology dictionary

  • feat — index act (undertaking), endeavor Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …   Law dictionary

  • Féat — Nom breton surtout porté dans le Finistère. Il semble s agir d un nom de personne qu on retrouve dans divers toponymes cités par A. Deshayes (voir bibliographie) : Kerfiat à Cléder (29), ou encore Lanfiat à Mahalon (29). Le terme lann (= lieu… …   Noms de famille

  • feat — [n] achievement accomplishment, act, action, adventure, attainment, conquest, consummation, coup, deed, effort, enterprise, execution, exploit, performance, stunt, tour de force, triumph, venture, victory; concepts 1,706 Ant. failure, idleness,… …   New thesaurus

  • feat — ► NOUN ▪ an achievement requiring great courage, skill, or strength. ORIGIN Old French fait, from Latin factum fact …   English terms dictionary

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