escheat
I. noun Etymology: Middle English eschete, from Anglo-French, reversion of property, from escheir to fall, devolve, from Vulgar Latin *excadēre, from Latin ex- + Vulgar Latin *cadēre to fall, from Latin cadere — more at chance Date: 14th century 1. escheated property 2. a. the reversion of lands in English feudal law to the lord of the fee when there are no heirs capable of inheriting under the original grant b. the reversion of property to the crown in England or to the state in the United States when there are no legal heirs II. verb Date: 14th century transitive verb to cause to revert by escheat intransitive verb to revert by escheat • escheatable adjective

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • escheat — es·cheat 1 /is chēt/ n [Anglo French eschete reversion of property, from Old French escheoite accession, inheritance, from feminine past participle of escheoir to fall (to), befall, ultimately from Latin ex out + cadere to fall] 1: escheated… …   Law dictionary

  • Escheat — is a common law doctrine that operates to ensure that property is not left in limbo and ownerless. It originally referred to a number of situations where a legal interest in land was destroyed by operation of law, so that the ownership of the… …   Wikipedia

  • Escheat — Es*cheat , n. [OE. eschete, escheyte, an escheat, fr. OF. escheit, escheoit, escheeite, esheoite, fr. escheoir (F. [ e]choir) to fall to, fall to the lot of; pref. es (L. ex) + cheoir, F. choir, to fall, fr. L. cadere. See {Chance}, and cf.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • escheat — [es chēt′] n. [ME eschete < OFr, lit., that which falls to one < pp. of escheoir, to fall to one s share < VL * excadere, to fall upon < L ex , out + cadere, to fall: see CASE1] Law 1. the reverting of property to the lord of the… …   English World dictionary

  • Escheat — Es*cheat , v. t. (Law) To forfeit. Bp. Hall. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Escheat — Es*cheat , v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Esheated}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Escheating}.] (Law) To revert, or become forfeited, to the lord, the crown, or the State, as lands by the failure of persons entitled to hold the same, or by forfeiture. [1913 Webster]… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • escheat — (n.) the reverting of land to a king or lord in certain cases, early 14c., from Anglo Fr. eschete (late 13c.), from O.Fr. eschete succession, inheritance, originally fem. pp. of escheoir, from L.L. *excadere to fall out, from L. ex out, away (see …   Etymology dictionary

  • escheat — escheatable, adj. /es cheet /, Law. n. 1. the reverting of property to the state or some agency of the state, or, as in England, to the lord of the fee or to the crown, when there is a failure of persons legally qualified to inherit or to claim.… …   Universalium

  • escheat — Reversion of monies or securities to the state in which the securityholder was last known to reside, when no claim by the securityholder has been made after a certain period of time fixed by state law. This is known as the holding period or cut… …   Financial and business terms

  • escheat — /əsˈtʃit/ (say uhs cheet) noun 1. (formerly) the reversion of land to the feudal lord or the Crown in the absence of heirs of the owner. 2. property or a possession which reverts by escheat. 3. the right to take property subject to escheat. –verb …   Australian English dictionary

  • escheat — es•cheat [[t]ɛsˈtʃit[/t]] Law. 1) law the reverting of property to the state or, as in England, to the crown when there are no legal heirs 2) law the right to take property subject to escheat 3) law (of property) to revert by escheat 4) law to… …   From formal English to slang

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”