I. adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Old English dunn — more at dusk Date: before 12th century 1. a. having the color dun b. of a horse having a grayish-yellow coat with black mane and tail 2. marked by dullness and drabness • dunness noun II. noun Date: 14th century 1. a dun horse 2. a variable color averaging a nearly neutral slightly brownish dark gray 3. a subadult mayfly; also an artificial fly tied to imitate such an insect III. transitive verb (dunned; dunning) Etymology: origin unknown Date: circa 1626 1. to make persistent demands upon for payment 2. plague, pester IV. noun Date: 1628 1. a person who duns 2. an urgent request; especially a demand for payment

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.


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  • dun — dun·al; dun·bar·ton·shire; dun·can; dun·ci·cal; dun·ci·fy; dun; dun·das·ite; dun·dathu; dun·dee; dun·der·funk; dun·der·head; dun·der·head·ed; dun·der·pate; dun·drear·ies; dun·edin; dun·ga·ree; dun·ga run·ga; dun·ge·ness; dun·ka·doo; dun·ker;… …   English syllables

  • DUN — Cette page d’homonymie répertorie les différents sujets et articles partageant un même nom. {{{image}}}   Sigles d une seule lettre   Sigles de deux lettres > Sigles de trois lettres …   Wikipédia en Français

  • dun — duñ interj. bum, du: Klausau – tik duñ, duñ, duñ dundina į duris Rdm. Girdi ragana su geležiniais klupsčiais stuk stuk stuk, dun dun dun TDrIV223(Kb). Dun dun duñ ratai kieman įdundėjo Š. Dun dun, dun dun [patrankos] dieną ir naktį, kad net… …   Dictionary of the Lithuanian Language

  • Dun —    , DUN HIM    When it comes to the origin of the word dun, most dictionaries play it safe and mark it obscure. They are wise because etymologists have disagreed for years over which of two plausible theories is the right one. According to some… …   Dictionary of eponyms

  • Dun —    DUN, a parish, in the county of Forfar, 4 miles (N. W. by W.) from Montrose; containing 581 inhabitants. This place by some antiquaries is supposed to have derived its name from the family of Dun, who were its ancient proprietors, and by… …   A Topographical dictionary of Scotland

  • Dun — Dun, a. [AS. dunn, of Celtic origin; cf. W. dwn, Ir. & Gael. donn.] Of a dark color; of a color partaking of a brown and black; of a dull brown color; swarthy. [1913 Webster] Summer s dun cloud comes thundering up. Pierpont. [1913 Webster] Chill… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • dun — 〈Adj.; nddt.〉 = duhn * * * dun <Adj.> [aus dem Niederd. < mniederd. dun, urspr. = geschwollen] (landsch.): betrunken: d. sein. * * * Dün   der, bewaldeter Muschelkalkhöhenzug im Eichsfeld, Nordwestthüringen, östlich von Heilbad… …   Universal-Lexikon

  • Dun — Saltar a navegación, búsqueda No debe confundirse con Dün. Dun País …   Wikipedia Español

  • Dun — Dun, n. 1. One who duns; a dunner. [1913 Webster] To be pulled by the sleeve by some rascally dun. Arbuthnot. [1913 Webster] 2. An urgent request or demand of payment; as, he sent his debtor a dun. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • dun — [dʌn] verb dunned PTandPPX dunning PRESPARTX [transitive] informal old fashioned to demand payment of an unpaid debt: • The IRS dunned the corporation for $6.3 million in back tax and penalties …   Financial and business terms

  • dun — duñ išt. Klausaũ – tik duñ duñ duñ į duri̇̀s …   Bendrinės lietuvių kalbos žodyno antraštynas

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