I. verb (disposed; disposing) Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French desposer, from Latin disponere to arrange (perfect indicative disposui), from dis- + ponere to put — more at position Date: 14th century transitive verb 1. to give a tendency to ; incline <
faulty diet disposes one to sickness
2. a. to put in place ; set in readiness ; arrange <
disposing troops for withdrawal
b. obsolete regulate c. bestow intransitive verb 1. to settle a matter finally 2. obsolete to come to terms Synonyms: see inclinedisposer noun II. noun Date: 1590 1. obsolete disposal 2. obsolete a. disposition b. demeanor

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.


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  • disposé — disposé, ée [ dispoze ] adj. • 1370 bien, mal disposé « en bonne, mauvaise santé »; de disposer 1 ♦ Arrangé, placé. Fleurs disposées avec goût. Objets disposés symétriquement. 2 ♦ Être disposé à : être préparé à, avoir l intention de. ⇒ 1. prêt… …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • Dispose — Dis*pose , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Disposed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Disposing}.] [F. disposer; pref. dis + poser to place. See {Pose}.] 1. To distribute and put in place; to arrange; to set in order; as, to dispose the ships in the form of a crescent.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • disposé — disposé, ée (di spô zé, zée) part. passé. 1°   Arrangé. Les feuilles disposées autour de la tige. Toutes choses disposées en un ordre admirable. 2°   Préparé pour, en parlant des choses. Une salle disposée pour un bal.    Absolument. •   Jamais… …   Dictionnaire de la Langue Française d'Émile Littré

  • dispose — dis‧pose [dɪˈspəʊz ǁ ˈspoʊz] verb dispose of something phrasal verb [transitive] 1. to get rid of something that is no longer needed or wanted: • We charge customers as little as DM50 to dispose of an old computer terminal. 2. COMMERCE …   Financial and business terms

  • Dispose — Dis*pose , n. 1. Disposal; ordering; management; power or right of control. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] But such is the dispose of the sole Disposer of empires. Speed. [1913 Webster] 2. Cast of mind; disposition; inclination; behavior; demeanor. [Obs.] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • dispose — ► VERB 1) (dispose of) get rid of. 2) arrange in a particular position. 3) give, sell, or transfer (money or assets). 4) incline (someone) towards a particular activity or frame of mind. DERIVATIVES disposer noun …   English terms dictionary

  • dispose — [di spōz′] vt. disposed, disposing [ME disposen < OFr disposer, to put apart, hence arrange < perf. stem of L disponere, to arrange: see DIS & POSITION] 1. to place in a certain order or arrangement 2. to arrange (matters); settle or… …   English World dictionary

  • Dispose — Dis*pose , v. i. To bargain; to make terms. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] She had disposed with C[ae]sar. Shak. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Dispose — is design pattern which is used to handle resource clean up in systems which use garbage collection. See also * Finalizer * Object lifetime * Destructor (computer science) …   Wikipedia

  • dispose — I (apportion) verb deal out, distribute, dole out, fix, mete out, parcel out, place II (incline) verb affect, arrange, bend, bias, decide, determine, incline, induce, influence, put, sway, tend, verge associated concepts: disposing mind and… …   Law dictionary

  • dispose — (v.) late 14c., from O.Fr. disposer (13c.) arrange, order, control, regulate (influenced in form by poser to place ), from from L. disponere put in order, arrange, distribute, from dis apart (see DIS (Cf. dis )) + ponere to put, place (see… …   Etymology dictionary

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