despite
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French despit, from Latin despectus, from despicere Date: 13th century 1. the feeling or attitude of despising ; contempt 2. malice, spite 3. a. an act showing contempt or defiance b. detriment, disadvantage <
I know of no government which stands to its obligations, even in its own despite, more solidly — Sir Winston Churchill
>
II. transitive verb (despited; despiting) Date: 14th century 1. archaic to treat with contempt 2. obsolete to provoke to anger ; vex III. preposition Date: 15th century in spite of <
played despite an injury
>

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Despite — Saltar a navegación, búsqueda Despite Información personal Origen Gotemburgo,  Suecia …   Wikipedia Español

  • Despite — De*spite , n. [OF. despit, F. d[ e]pit, fr. L. despectus contempt, fr. despicere. See {Despise}, and cf. {Spite}, {Despect}.] 1. Malice; malignity; spite; malicious anger; contemptuous hate. [1913 Webster] With all thy despite against the land of …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Despite — Pays d’origine  Suede !Suède Genre musical Heavy metal Années d activité 1998 Aujourd hui …   Wikipédia en Français

  • despite — despite, in spite of These two prepositions are largely interchangeable and both can be followed by nouns or noun phrases or by constructions introduced by a participle (a verb ending in ing): played despite an ankle sprain / had a restless night …   Modern English usage

  • Despite — may refer to: A preposition Despite (band), A Swedish metal band USS Despite (AM 89), an Adroit class minesweeper of the United States Navy This disambiguation page lists articles associated with the same title. If an …   Wikipedia

  • Despite — De*spite , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Despited}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Despiting}.] [OF. despitier, fr. L. despectare, intens. of despicere. See {Despite}, n.] To vex; to annoy; to offend contemptuously. [Obs.] Sir W. Raleigh. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Despite — De*spite , prep. In spite of; against, or in defiance of; notwithstanding; as, despite his prejudices. Syn: See {Notwithstanding}. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • despite — c.1300, from O.Fr. despit (12c., Mod.Fr. dépit), from L. despectus a looking down on, scorn, contempt, from pp. of despicere (see DESPISE (Cf. despise)). The preposition (early 15c.) is short for in despite of (late 13c.), a loan translation of O …   Etymology dictionary

  • despite — n 1 spite, ill will, malevolence, spleen, grudge, *malice, malignity, malignancy Analogous words: contempt, scorn, disdain (see under DESPISE): abhorrence, loathing, detestation, abomination, hatred, hate (see under HATE vb) Antonyms:… …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • despite — [di spīt′] n. [ME & OFr despit < L despectus, a looking down upon, despising < despicere: see DESPISE] 1. a contemptuous act; insult; injury 2. malice; spite 3. Archaic contempt; scorn prep. in spite of; notwithstanding vt. despited …   English World dictionary

  • despite — index contumely, irrespective, notwithstanding, odium, regardless, spite Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …   Law dictionary

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