I. noun Etymology: Middle English, cultivated land, cultivation, from Anglo-French, from Latin cultura, from cultus, past participle Date: 15th century 1. cultivation, tillage 2. the act of developing the intellectual and moral faculties especially by education 3. expert care and training <
beauty culture
4. a. enlightenment and excellence of taste acquired by intellectual and aesthetic training b. acquaintance with and taste in fine arts, humanities, and broad aspects of science as distinguished from vocational and technical skills 5. a. the integrated pattern of human knowledge, belief, and behavior that depends upon the capacity for learning and transmitting knowledge to succeeding generations b. the customary beliefs, social forms, and material traits of a racial, religious, or social group; also the characteristic features of everyday existence (as diversions or a way of life) shared by people in a place or time <
popular culture
southern culture
c. the set of shared attitudes, values, goals, and practices that characterizes an institution or organization <
a corporate culture focused on the bottom line
d. the set of values, conventions, or social practices associated with a particular field, activity, or societal characteristic <
studying the effect of computers on print culture
changing the culture of materialism will take time — Peggy O'Mara
6. the act or process of cultivating living material (as bacteria or viruses) in prepared nutrient media; also a product of such cultivation II. transitive verb (cultured; culturing) Date: 1510 1. cultivate 2. a. to grow in a prepared medium b. to start a culture from

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.


Look at other dictionaries:

  • Culture — culture …   Dictionary of sociology

  • culture — 1. Here is a word that had mixed fortunes in the 20c, and means all things to all men. There are about 128,000 examples of it (including the plural form and compounds such as culture bound) in the 500 million word Oxford English Corpus (language… …   Modern English usage

  • culture — cul‧ture [ˈkʌltʆə ǁ ər] noun 1. [countable, uncountable] the ideas, beliefs, and customs that are shared and accepted by people in a society: • Western culture places a high value on material wealth. 2. [countable, uncountable] the attitudes or… …   Financial and business terms

  • Culture — Cul ture (k?l t?r; 135), n. [F. culture, L. cultura, fr. colere to till, cultivate; of uncertain origin. Cf. {Colony}.] 1. The act or practice of cultivating, or of preparing the earth for seed and raising crops by tillage; as, the culture of the …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • culture — CULTURE. s. f. Les travaux qu on emploie pour rendre la terre plus fertile, et pour améliorer ses productions. La culture des champs. La culture des vignes, des plantes, des fleurs. Travailler, s adonner à la culture de ... Abandonner la culture… …   Dictionnaire de l'Académie Française 1798

  • culture — (n.) mid 15c., the tilling of land, from M.Fr. culture and directly from L. cultura a cultivating, agriculture, figuratively care, culture, an honoring, from pp. stem of colere tend, guard, cultivate, till (see CULT (Cf. cult)). The figurative… …   Etymology dictionary

  • culture — n 1 Culture, cultivation, breeding, refinement are comparable when they denote a quality of a person or group of persons which reflects his or their possession of excellent taste, manners, and social adjustment. Culture implies a high degree of… …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • culture — Culture. s. f. v. Les façons qu on donne à la terre pour la rendre plus fertile, & aux arbres & aux plantes pour les faire mieux venir, & les faire mieux rapporter. La culture de la terre. la culture des vignes, des plantes. travailler à la… …   Dictionnaire de l'Académie française

  • culture — [n1] breeding, education, sophistication ability, accomplishment, address, aestheticism, art, capacity, civilization, class, courtesy, cultivation, delicacy, dignity, discrimination, dress, elegance, elevation, enlightenment, erudition,… …   New thesaurus

  • culture — [kul′chər] n. [ME < L cultura < colere: see CULT] 1. cultivation of the soil 2. production, development, or improvement of a particular plant, animal, commodity, etc. 3. a) the growth of bacteria, microorganisms, or other plant and animal… …   English World dictionary

  • Culture — Cul ture, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Cultured} ( t?rd; 135); p. pr. & vb. n. {Culturing}.] To cultivate; to educate. [1913 Webster] They came . . . into places well inhabited and cultured. Usher. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”