correct
I. transitive verb Etymology: Middle English, from Latin correctus, past participle of corrigere, from com- + regere to lead straight — more at right Date: 14th century 1. a. to make or set right ; amend <
correct an error
>
b. counteract, neutralize <
correct a harmful tendency
>
c. to alter or adjust so as to bring to some standard or required condition <
correct a lens for spherical aberration
>
2. a. to punish (as a child) with a view to reforming or improving b. to point out usually for amendment the errors or faults of <
spent the day correcting tests
>
correctable adjectivecorrector noun Synonyms: correct, rectify, emend, remedy, redress, amend, reform, revise mean to make right what is wrong. correct implies taking action to remove errors, faults, deviations, defects <
correct your spelling
>
. rectify implies a more essential changing to make something right, just, or properly controlled or directed <
rectify a misguided policy
>
. emend specifically implies correction of a text or manuscript <
emend a text
>
. remedy implies removing or making harmless a cause of trouble, harm, or evil <
set out to remedy the evils of the world
>
. redress implies making compensation or reparation for an unfairness, injustice, or imbalance <
redress past social injustices
>
. amend, reform, revise imply an improving by making corrective changes, amend usually suggesting slight changes <
amend a law
>
, reform implying drastic change <
plans to reform the court system
>
, and revise suggesting a careful examination of something and the making of necessary changes <
revise the schedule
>
. Synonym: see in addition punish. II. adjective Etymology: Middle English, corrected, from Latin correctus, from past participle of corrigere Date: 1668 1. conforming to an approved or conventional standard <
correct behavior
>
2. conforming to or agreeing with fact, logic, or known truth <
a correct response
>
3. conforming to a set figure <
enclosed the correct return postage
>
4. conforming to the strict requirements of a specific ideology or set of beliefs or values <
environmentally correct
>
<
spiritually correct
>
correctly adverbcorrectness noun Synonyms: correct, accurate, exact, precise, nice, right mean conforming to fact, standard, or truth. correct usually implies freedom from fault or error <
correct answers
>
<
socially correct dress
>
. accurate implies fidelity to fact or truth attained by exercise of care <
an accurate description
>
. exact stresses a very strict agreement with fact, standard, or truth <
exact measurements
>
. precise adds to exact an emphasis on sharpness of definition or delimitation <
precise calibration
>
. nice stresses great precision and delicacy of adjustment or discrimination <
makes nice distinctions
>
. right is close to correct but has a stronger positive emphasis on conformity to fact or truth rather than mere absence of error or fault <
the right thing to do
>
.

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • correct — correct, e [ kɔrɛkt ] adj. • 1512; lat. correctus, de corrigere → corriger 1 ♦ Qui respecte les règles, dans un domaine déterminé. Phrase grammaticalement correcte. « Je lui dois [à Fontanes] ce qu il y a de correct dans mon style »… …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • correct — vb 1 Correct, rectify, emend, remedy, redress, amend, reform, revise mean to set or make right something which is wrong. One corrects something which is inaccurate, untrue, or imperfect or which contains errors, faults, or defects, when one by… …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • correct — correct, ecte (ko rrèkt, rrè kt ; le ct se prononce ; Chifflet, Gramm. p. 208, l indique dans le XVIIe s. ; le pluriel se prononce comme au singulier : des auteurs corrects et élégants, dites : des auteurs ko rrè kt et élégants ; mais comment… …   Dictionnaire de la Langue Française d'Émile Littré

  • correct — Correct, [corr]ecte. adj. Où il n y a point de fautes. Il se dit de l escriture, & du langage. Ce livre est fort correct. il en fit faire une copie correcte. son langage, son discours, son style est fort correct. cette phrase est correcte, n est… …   Dictionnaire de l'Académie française

  • correct — UK US /kəˈrekt/ verb ► [I or T] if prices, values, etc. correct or correct themselves, they change and become more normal after a period of being too high, too low, etc.: »The market is positioned to correct and that is what s happening. »Experts …   Financial and business terms

  • Correct — Cor*rect (k[^o]r*r[e^]kt ), a. [L. correctus, p. p. of corrigere to make straight, to correct; cor + regere to lead straight: cf. F. correct. See {Regular}, {Right}, and cf. {Escort}.] Set right, or made straight; hence, conformable to truth,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • correct — CORRECT, ECTE. adj. Où il n y a point de fautes. Il se dit De l écriture et du langage. Ce Livre est fort correct. Il en fit faire une copie correcte. Son langage, son discours, son style est fort correct. Cette phrase est correcte, n est pas… …   Dictionnaire de l'Académie Française 1798

  • Correct — Cor*rect , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Corrected}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Correcting}.] 1. To make right; to bring to the standard of truth, justice, or propriety; to rectify; as, to correct manners or principles. [1913 Webster] This is a defect in the first… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • correct — [kə rekt′] vt. [ME correcten < L correctus, pp. of corrigere < com , together + regere, to lead straight, rule: see RECKON] 1. to make right; change from wrong to right; remove errors from 2. to point out or mark the errors or faults of 3.… …   English World dictionary

  • correct — [adj1] accurate, exact according to Hoyle*, actual, amen*, appropriate, cooking with gas*, dead on*, equitable, factual, faithful, faultless, flawless, for sure, free of error, impeccable, just, legitimate, nice, okay, on target*, on the ball*,… …   New thesaurus

  • correct — (v.) mid 14c., to set right, rectify (a fault or error), from L. correctus, pp. of corrigere to put straight, reduce to order, set right; in transf. use, to reform, amend, especially of speech or writing, from com , intensive prefix (see COM (Cf …   Etymology dictionary

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