I. adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Latin conjunctus, past participle of conjungere Date: 15th century 1. united, joined 2. joint 3. relating to melodic progression by intervals of no more than a major second — compare disjunct II. noun Date: 1667 1. something joined or associated with another; specifically one of the components of a conjunction 2. an adverb or adverbial (as so, in addition, however, secondly) that indicates the speaker's or writer's assessment of the connection between linguistic units (as clauses)

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

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  • conjunct — CONJÚNCT, Ă, conjuncţi, te, adj. (În sintagma) Forme conjuncte = formele scurte ale prezentului indicativ pers. 1 sg. ( s) şi pers. 3 sg. şi pl. ( i, s) al verbului a fi şi formele neaccentuate ale pronumelui personal la dativ şi acuzativ sg. şi… …   Dicționar Român

  • Conjunct — Con*junct , a. [L. conjunctus, p. p. See {Conjoin}.] 1. United; conjoined; concurrent. [Archaic] [1913 Webster] 2. (Her.) Same as {Conjoined}. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • conjunct — I adjective allied, amalgamated, associated, binding, coadunate, coalescent, coherent, cohesive, combined, complex, composite, concerted, conjoint, connected, consensual, consolidated, contiguous, cooperative, correlative, incorporated,… …   Law dictionary

  • conjunct — mid 15c., from L. conjunctus, pp. of conjugare (see CONJUGAL (Cf. conjugal)). A doublet of CONJOINT (Cf. conjoint) …   Etymology dictionary

  • conjunct — [kən juŋkt′; ] also, and for n.always [, kän′juŋkt΄] adj. [ML < L conjunctus, pp. of conjungere: see CONJOIN] 1. joined together; joint; associated 2. Music pertaining to progression by successive degrees of a scale n. a person or thing joined …   English World dictionary

  • Conjunct — Not to be confused with Conjunct (music). In linguistics, the term conjunct has three distinct uses: A conjunct is an adjunct that adds information to the sentence that is not considered part of the propositional content (or at least not… …   Wikipedia

  • conjunct — conjunctly, adv. adj. /keuhn jungkt , kon jungkt/; n. /kon jungkt/, adj. 1. bound in close association; conjoined; combined; united: conjunct ideas; conjunct influences. 2. formed by conjunction. 3. Gram. a. occurring only in combination with an… …   Universalium

  • conjunct — Conjoint Con*joint , a. [F. conjoint, p. p. of conjoindre. See {Conjoin}, and cf. {Conjunct}.] United; connected; associated. Influence conjoint. Glover. [1913 Webster] {Conjoint degrees} (Mus.), two notes which follow each other immediately in… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • conjunct — con•junct adj. [[t]kənˈdʒʌŋkt, ˈkɒn dʒʌŋkt[/t]] n. [[t]ˈkɒn dʒʌŋkt[/t]] adj. 1) bound in close association; conjoined; united: conjunct influences[/ex] 2) formed by conjunction 3) mad progressing melodically by intervals of a second: the conjunct …   From formal English to slang

  • conjunct — 1. noun a) Either term of a conjunction b) An adjunct that supplements a sentence with information, not considered to be an essential part of the propositional content, that connects the sentence with previous parts of the discourse, as therefore …   Wiktionary

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