I. noun Etymology: origin unknown Date: 1567 1. turmoil 2. trouble; also everyday cares and worries <
when we have shuffled off this mortal coil — Shakespeare
II. verb Etymology: French coillir, cuillir to gather — more at cull Date: 1611 transitive verb 1. to wind into rings or spirals <
coil a rope
2. to roll or twist into a shape resembling a coil <
coiled herself up on the couch
intransitive verb 1. to move in a circular or spiral course 2. to form or lie in a coil • coilability noun III. noun Date: 1661 1. a. (1) a series of loops (2) spiral b. a single loop of such a coil 2. a. a number of turns of wire wound around a core (as of iron) to create a magnetic field for an electromagnet or an induction coil b. induction coil 3. a series of connected pipes in rows, layers, or windings 4. a roll of postage stamps; also a stamp from such a roll

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.


Look at other dictionaries:

  • Coil — Жанры Пост индастриал Экспериментальный индастриал Дарк эмбиент Годы 1982 2004 …   Википедия

  • Coil — Origen London, England Información artística Alias Black Light District, ELpH, Sickness of Snakes, The Eskaton, Time Machines Género(s) Industrial, post industrial …   Wikipedia Español

  • Coil — Pays d’origine  Angleterre Genre musical Musique expérimentale, Musique industrielle, Musique concrète, Drone music, Ambient, Glitc …   Wikipédia en Français

  • coil — coil; coil·er; re·coil·less; re·coil·ment; un·coil; su·per·coil; re·coil; …   English syllables

  • Coil — [ kɔɪl; engl. coil = Knäuel, Windung, Spirale, Spule], das; s, s: Bez. für die richtungslose ↑ Konformation, die wird von gelösten synthetischen Polymeren u. Biopolymeren in manchen Lsgm. bevorzugt eingenommen wird, vgl. Helix. * * * Coil  … …   Universal-Lexikon

  • Coil — Coil, n. 1. A ring, series of rings, or spiral, into which a rope, or other like thing, is wound. [1913 Webster] The wild grapevines that twisted their coils from trec to tree. W. Irving. [1913 Webster] 2. Fig.: Entanglement; toil; mesh;… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Coil — Coil, v. i. To wind itself cylindrically or spirally; to form a coil; to wind; often with about or around. [1913 Webster] You can see his flery serpents . . . Coiting, playing in the water. Longfellow. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Coil — (koil), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Coiled} (koild); p. pr. & vb. n. {Coiling}.] [OF. coillir, F. cueillir, to collect, gather together, L. coligere; col + legere to gather. See {Legend}, and cf. {Cull}, v. t., {Collect}.] 1. To wind cylindrically or… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Coil — [kɔyl] das; s <aus gleichbed. engl. coil zu to coil »aufwickeln«> dünnes, aufgewickeltes Walzblech …   Das große Fremdwörterbuch

  • coil — ► NOUN 1) a length of something wound in a joined sequence of concentric loops. 2) an intrauterine contraceptive device in the form of a coil. 3) an electrical device consisting of a coiled wire, for converting the level of a voltage, producing a …   English terms dictionary

  • Coil — Coil, n. [Of Celtic origin; cf. Gael. goil fume, rage.] A noise, tumult, bustle, or confusion. [Obs.] Shak. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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