close
I. verb (closed; closing) Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French clos-, stem of clore, from Latin claudere to shut, close; perhaps akin to Greek kleiein to close — more at clavicle Date: 13th century transitive verb 1. a. to move so as to bar passage through something <
close the gate
>
b. to block against entry or passage <
close a street
>
c. to deny access to <
the city closed the beach
>
d. screen, exclude <
close a view
>
e. to suspend or stop the operations of <
close school
>
— often used with down 2. archaic enclose, contain 3. a. to bring to an end or period <
close an account
>
b. to conclude discussion or negotiation about <
the question is closed
>
; also to consummate by performing something previously agreed <
close a transfer of real estate title
>
c. to terminate access to (a computer file or program) 4. a. to bring or bind together the parts or edges of <
a closed book
>
b. to fill up (as an opening) c. to make complete by circling or enveloping or by making continuous <
close a circuit
>
d. to reduce to nil <
closed the distance to the lead racer
>
intransitive verb 1. a. to contract, fold, swing, or slide so as to leave no opening <
the door closed quietly
>
b. to cease operation <
the factory closed down
>
<
the stores close at 9 p.m.
>
2. a. to draw near <
the ship was closing with the island
>
b. to engage in a struggle at close quarters ; grapple <
close with the enemy
>
3. a. to come together ; meet b. to draw the free foot up to the supporting foot in dancing 4. to enter into or complete an agreement <
close on a deal
>
5. to come to an end or period <
the services closed with a short prayer
>
6. to reduce a gap <
closed to within two points
>
closable or closeable adjective Synonyms: close, end, conclude, finish, complete, terminate mean to bring or come to a stopping point or limit. close usually implies that something has been in some way open as well as unfinished <
close a debate
>
. end conveys a strong sense of finality <
ended his life
>
. conclude may imply a formal closing (as of a meeting) <
the service concluded with a blessing
>
. finish may stress completion of a final step in a process <
after it is painted, the house will be finished
>
. complete implies the removal of all deficiencies or a successful finishing of what has been undertaken <
the resolving of this last issue completes the agreement
>
. terminate implies the setting of a limit in time or space <
your employment terminates after three months
>
. II. noun Date: 14th century 1. a. a coming or bringing to a conclusion <
at the close of the party
>
b. a conclusion or end in time or existence ; cessation <
the decade drew to a close
>
c. the concluding passage (as of a speech or play) 2. the conclusion of a musical strain or period ; cadence 3. archaic a hostile encounter 4. the movement of the free foot in dancing toward or into contact with the supporting foot III. noun Etymology: Middle English clos, literally, enclosure, from Anglo-French clos, from Latin clausum, from neuter of clausus, past participle Date: 13th century 1. a. an enclosed area b. chiefly British the precinct of a cathedral 2. chiefly British a. a narrow passage leading from a street to a court and the houses within or to the common stairway of tenements b. a road closed at one end IV. adjective (closer; closest) Etymology: Middle English clos, from Anglo-French, from Latin clausus, past participle of claudere Date: 14th century 1. having no openings ; closed 2. a. confined or carefully guarded <
close arrest
>
b. (1) of a vowel high 13 (2) formed with the tongue in a higher position than for the other vowel of a pair 3. restricted to a privileged class 4. a. secluded, secret b. secretive <
she could tell us something if she would…but she was as close as wax — A. Conan Doyle
>
5. strict, rigorous <
keep close watch
>
6. hot and stuffy <
a room with an uncomfortably close atmosphere
>
7. not generous in giving or spending ; tight 8. having little space between items or units <
a close weave
>
<
a close grain
>
9. a. fitting tightly or exactly <
a close fit
>
b. very short or near to the surface <
a close haircut
>
10. being near in time, space, effect, or degree <
at close range
>
<
close to my birthday
>
<
close to the speed of sound
>
11. intimate, familiar <
close friends
>
12. a. very precise and attentive to details <
a close reading
>
<
a close study
>
b. marked by fidelity to an original <
a close copy of an old master
>
c. terse, compact 13. decided or won by a narrow margin <
a close baseball game
>
14. difficult to obtain <
money is close
>
15. of punctuation characterized by liberal use especially of commas Synonyms: see stingyclosely adverbcloseness noun V. adverb Date: 15th century in a close position or manner

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Close — (kl[=o]s), a. [Compar. {Closer} (kl[=o] s[ e]r); superl. {Closest}.] [Of. & F. clos, p. p. of clore. See {Close}, v. t.] 1. Shut fast; closed; tight; as, a close box. [1913 Webster] From a close bower this dainty music flowed. Dryden. [1913… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • close — vb 1 Close, shut are very close synonyms in the sense of to stop or fill in an opening by means of a closure (as a door, a gate, a lid, or a cover) and are often used interchangeably. However, they may have distinctive nuances of meaning and… …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • close — close1 [klōs] adj. closer, closest [ME clos < OFr < L clausus, pp. of claudere (see CLOSE2); senses under II from notion “with spaces or intervals closed up”] I denoting the fact or state of being closed or confined 1. shut; not open 2.… …   English World dictionary

  • close — 1 vb closed, clos·ing vt 1: to bring to an end or to a state of completion closed the case close an estate by liquidating its assets closing his account 2: to con …   Law dictionary

  • close — Ⅰ. close [1] ► ADJECTIVE 1) only a short distance away or apart in space or time. 2) (of a connection or resemblance) strong. 3) denoting someone who is part of a person s immediate family. 4) (of a relationship or the people conducting it) very… …   English terms dictionary

  • Close — ist der Familienname folgender Personen: Alex Close, belgischer Radrennfahrer Brian Close, englischer Cricketspieler Charles Close, britischer Geograph Chuck Close (* 1940), US amerikanischer Maler Del Close, US amerikanischer Schauspieler und… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Close — may refer to: Close (surname) In music: Close , a song by Rascal Flatts from Unstoppable Close , a song by Soul Asylum from Candy from a Stranger Close , a song by Westlife from Coast to Coast Close (to the Edit) , a song by Art of Noise Other:… …   Wikipedia

  • close — [adj1] near, nearby abutting, across the street, adjacent, adjoining, approaching, around the corner, at hand, contiguous, convenient, give or take a little*, handy, hard by, immediate, imminent, impending, in spitting distance*, in the ball… …   New thesaurus

  • close — close; close·ly; close·ness; close·out; close·stool; close·up; en·close; fore·close; un·close; dis·close; par·close; …   English syllables

  • close — close, closely The adjective close merges into an adverb in uses such as come close, lie close, run close, stick close, etc., especially in figurative uses: • Opera and large gatherings ran each other close for first place among her dislikes J.… …   Modern English usage

  • Close — (kl[=o]z), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Closed} (kl[=o]zd); p. pr. & vb. n. {Closing}.] [From OF. & F. clos, p. p. of clore to close, fr. L. claudere; akin to G. schliessen to shut, and to E. clot, cloister, clavicle, conclude, sluice. Cf. {Clause}, n.]… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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